Honda CBR 1000RR Forums banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
2007 CBR1000RR
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just took my clutch cover off on my 2007 to replace the RTV because I was sick on the dirt building up around the seam. When I took the cover off, the starter reduction gear (long rod with two gears on either end) was very loose. I didn’t make it a point to line up the idle gear and starter reduction gear before putting the cover on. I just finessed the cover upward until I caught the starter reduction gear in its bore, and then finished seating it onto the idler shaft and the dowels. Is it normal for the reduction shaft to have so much play? And is it safe to assume that since I got both (starter and idler) shafts in their holes in the clutch cover, that their gears lined up?
 

·
Registered
2007 CBR1000RR
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Here is how to test all parts are assembled correctly. Bike in neutral. Remove the timing hole cover and gently rotate the crankshaft COUNTERCLOCKWISE. Do not worry about loosening the bolt. It's torqued on there super tight.

You should clearly hear the starter motor whirling around.
Thanks 09_Blade. One more question I have is about scotchbrite pads. The whole reason I took the right crankcase cover off was to re-gasket it. I used grey scotchbrite pads to clean the mating surface of the cover and crank case. I held a microfiber cloth in my right hand directly below or next to the scotchbrite in an attempt to catch any aluminum oxide and RTV particles that fell off of it. Afterward I wiped down the surfaces in the clutch/starter clutch housing with a microfiber to get any remaining particles. For the cover I sprayed it down with brake cleaner until no more visible RTV/scotchbrite particles were visible. Everything I read online about using scotchbrite in an engine says getting even a tiny amount of Aluminum oxide in the engine oil will grenade an engine. I was super paranoid after reading that, so before I even ran the bike I tipped it over on its right side to slosh oil around the clutch housing and catch any particles (the clutch housing and oil pan are connected by a large opening). I then drained the oil and changed the filter. I still haven’t started my engine out of fear and paranoia. Does it sound like I did a good job mitigating the risks associated with using scotchbrite pads?
 

·
Classifieds Moderator
Joined
·
708 Posts
Before the oil pump there is an oil strainer in the engine that catches big particles like RTV bits. Then after the pump there's an oil filter in the engine that comes before any bearings. No worries about it. If it's any consolation to you, when I took apart a stock engine, there were bits of gasket in the oil strainer from the factory sealant.

For future reference, odorless mineral spirits will melt the OEM gasket right off and let you wipe it clean with a paper towel or plastic scraper. Not sure about RTV that you used in case you want to get it off in the future.
 

·
Registered
2007 CBR1000RR
Joined
·
43 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before the oil pump there is an oil strainer in the engine that catches big particles like RTV bits. Then after the pump there's an oil filter in the engine that comes before any bearings. No worries about it. If it's any consolation to you, when I took apart a stock engine, there were bits of gasket in the oil strainer from the factory sealant.

For future reference, odorless mineral spirits will melt the OEM gasket right off and let you wipe it clean with a paper towel or plastic scraper. Not sure about RTV that you used in case you want to get it off in the future.
Im not so much concerned about the gasket material as I am about the scotchbrite abrasive scuffing pads. Apparently they shed aluminum oxide dust that acts like sandpaper in your engine. Although most failures I found were from people who prepared an entire deck surface with it without blocking any oil ports, or some large surface area job like that. It’s enough for most car manufacturers to put out technical service bulletins warning against using abrasive products because of bearing damage. Even aircraft mechanics are banned from using scotchbrite on the exterior of the aircraft in fear that the abrasive dust will somehow make it into the engines/turbines. I know for every story online about failure due to abrasive contamination, there are probably tens of thousands of people who used scotchbrite and never had an issue. I know I’m being paranoid, but most of the stuff I read online made it seem like you’ll throw a rod by just saying “scotchbrite” in front of your engine lol. I hope I was clean enough.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top