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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

I just picked up a liter of ATE Super Blue Brake Fluid to run in my clutch and brake lines. It says you can mix it with the DOT 4 fluid currently in my brake system, but should I drain out the DOT 4 first, then bleed from scratch with the super blue? Or... can I just empty the resevoirs and keep filling them until it runs blue out the bleeding valve?

Has any done it either way? Do you get the same benefits either way? Any opinions?

Thanks in advance
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Second Question

I figured that would be the best way.

Second Question, does anyone know what size the FRONT and REAR hoses are from the resevoirs to the master cylinders? 6mm, 8mm, or 10mm?
 

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^^^^^^ i wonder if he caught (and took serious) the sarcastic but true correction
 

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smokin a Jeffery
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ive been running ATE for years now. just evacuate as much from the res as possible. then bleed away. i normally do 3 vac sessions per caliper. then go back and do one more vac per side. always been good to go after that.
 

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dont worry about bleeding before refilling. start removing the old fluid but keep the res. full of your new fluid. once blue starts flowing you know you have gotten all the old fluid out.
 

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Is the super blue a denser fluid? What is the benefit of this over Dot4?
 

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smokin a Jeffery
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Is the super blue a denser fluid? What is the benefit of this over Dot4?
ATE is dot4., but has a higher wet and dry boiling point over other fluids. if i remember correctly it has 539* dry and 339* wet boiling points.
 

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smokin a Jeffery
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Maybe so? But if you're going to bleed and vacuum the system like others are saying....does it really matter whether you drain the old fluid first or mix in the new? No.
ok guys, listen up. maby we on .net need to spell things out, or type every damn word so you guys can get it.

what to do, the proper way:
remove all but a tiny bit of old fluid form the res. dont remove every last drop, as you might get air into the brake system.

the reason is this, if you mix alot of old fluid and new fluid, your not really bringing fresh fluid thru the brake lines. your bringing contaminated fluid (old fluid and new fluid) thru the lines untill 3-4 full refills of new fluid in the res. by removing as much old fluid as you can, your not contaminating the new fluid as much as you would by doing it your above mentioned half ass way--- the wrong way.
 

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ok guys, listen up. maby we on .net need to spell things out, or type every damn word so you guys can get it.

what to do, the proper way:
remove all but a tiny bit of old fluid form the res. dont remove every last drop, as you might get air into the brake system.

the reason is this, if you mix alot of old fluid and new fluid, your not really bringing fresh fluid thru the brake lines. your bringing contaminated fluid (old fluid and new fluid) thru the lines untill 3-4 full refills of new fluid in the res. by removing as much old fluid as you can, your not contaminating the new fluid as much as you would by doing it your above mentioned half ass way--- the wrong way.
Thanks teach.
Maybe I wasn't clear enough on my initial advice of "draining and refilling" I meant the reservoir. I sometimes forget that not everyone knows every aspect of the things they're trying to accomplish. But fear not, there are plenty of sarcastic educators to spell things out for the not so well enlightened, eh?:thumbsup:
 

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ATE is dot4., but has a higher wet and dry boiling point over other fluids. if i remember correctly it has 539* dry and 339* wet boiling points.
So it takes the heat of repeated hard breaking better. What do you mean by wet and dry boiling points?
 

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So it takes the heat of repeated hard breaking better. What do you mean by wet and dry boiling points?
Dry boiling points specify what temperature the fluid will boil at when no measurable amount of water has been absorbed by the brake fluid. Wet boiling points specify the boiling point of the brake fluid once it's absorbed a certain amount of water.
 

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Dry boiling points specify what temperature the fluid will boil at when no measurable amount of water has been absorbed by the brake fluid. Wet boiling points specify the boiling point of the brake fluid once it's absorbed a certain amount of water.
ahhhh cool thanks info
 
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