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Discussion Starter #1
I have prepared this Do It Yourself (DIY) article titled "Brake Pads - Rear, Replacement - CBR1000RR8 DIY" for my 2008 CBR1000RR Fireblade which has now run above 24.000 km and got new rear brake pads.

This is the next in a series of DIY articles on CBR1000RR8 and CBF1000A7.

Please join in on this thread with corrections, suggestions, questions and discussion.

Cheers ... Fred
 

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Bout to replace my rear pad this evening. Will be using your DIY for my first attempt at brake pad replacement. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Hi Curry,

replacing rear pads should not present any problem - it's one of the simpler DIY tasks :thumbsup:
In case You do run into problems, just yell loud in this thread.

For other DIY tasks, You might find the section about stuck bolts and nuts in the How to DIY article worth reading.

Cheers ... Fred
 

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Me being not the best DIY person world, this was hella easy. I was told the front might be a little harder. Im up for the challenge.

Thanks
 

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I was told the front might be a little harder.
If anything, the front pad swap-out is easier than the rear. At least, I've found that to be so...
 

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Shouldnt the rear pads last the life of the bike for the most part. Unless your a track junkie. I never touch my rear brake unless I'm not on pavement or black top and need to slow down.
 

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Shouldnt the rear pads last the life of the bike for the most part. Unless your a track junkie. I never touch my rear brake unless I'm not on pavement or black top and need to slow down.
Same experience here. I'm still running the original stock rear brake pads on my G1K, and the bike is over five years old with close to 52,000+ miles.
 

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I lost track how many guys I ran into who never use their front brakes. Even guys that got their first "crotch rocket". They say they dont want to go over the bars or lock up the front brake. I try to explain it to them and they just dont get it.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I lost track how many guys I ran into who never use their front brakes. Even guys that got their first "crotch rocket". They say they dont want to go over the bars or lock up the front brake. I try to explain it to them and they just dont get it.
:loco:
Considering how dangerous poor braking capabilities is when in trafic, that type of guys must belong to a group of endangered species!

I try to imagine how long a road I would need to make a full stop from 250 km/h with the rear brake alone. I guess 1 km would be needed!
 

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Okay, I know I'm digging up an old thread here but...

Tried to replace my rear pads today and it was extremely difficult to get the new ones in. When I finally got them in, the rear wheel would barely turn so I took it around the block to see if it would free up a little and it didn't. Also, aside from it dragging, applying the rear brake didn't seem to do anything.

I know this should be pretty easy because everything I've read just says remove and replace. Is it possible that the new pads are too thick?

p.s. I did this because I was replacing the lines and figured I should replace everything at the same time so the brakes were bled properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
If the brakes will not let the rear wheel rotate it must be because one of the normal movements in the brake system have been stuck. This can have different causes:

1) The rear brake caliper does not slide as easy sideways on the bracket pin as it should. Have a look on the picturre in section 2 of the DIY article where you push the caliper sideways. If you remove the pads from the caliper you will be able to check if this works ok or it is stuck.

2) The brake pads shall off-couse be of the correct type, and it should not have required any significant force at all to mount them. The rightmost pad shall be able to move freely sideways on it's pad pins inside the caliper. Check that this is ok.

3) A piston may be stuck dure to rust or other debris. It shall be possible to push the pistons back with finger pressure, and see them move out when you press the brake pedal. Check this.

4) The brake hose shall be replaced if in doubt of its condition. The rubber on the inside of old brake hooses may come partly loose and form valves which allow fluid flow in forward direction but not in reverse.

5) The rear master cylinder may be faulty, allthough I guess this is not often.

I suggest you check free movement as described in nr. 1, 2, 3 and 4 and see what comes out of this investigation.

:) ... Fred
 

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3) A piston may be stuck dure to rust or other debris. It shall be possible to push the pistons back with finger pressure, and see them move out when you press the brake pedal.
If this is indeed the case, then it's highly advisable to actually pump the piston out *slightly*, just enough to clean the accumulated road grime and brake dust off of it. Otherwise it can cause brake drag and more problems.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
d207gp - your method will work in some cases. In other cases it will be enough to just work the pistons in and out a couple of times. And if theese two methods does not make the pistons move freely, the brake caliper must be overhauled, maybe even replaced.
 
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