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Discussion Starter #1
I picked up a EK 520 GP 120 link chain back when I was parts crazy and then thought that it would be stupid to swap a new chain out and figured I would wait a bit. This was the right chain to get right? Im at 12k miles and figure now would be the time since I need another rear tire this year yet.....feel free to point out any fault in my logic. My other question is what else should I change with the chain? Do I need a connecting link too? What about sprockets, change both right away? Which sprockets to get(im happy enough with stock ratio because it keeps things tame for street)? Is there anything else that needs servicing, or am I good to run forever without care because Honda?
 

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If you're going to put on a new chain, I'd suggest replacing the sprockets while you're at it. Of note: The stock chain pitch is 530, so if the sprockets are stock, the 520 chain will not fit. Be sure to get 520 pitch sprockets. A great write up, by a forum member, regarding 520 swap can be found here ROGUE RACING CBR1000RR Gearing / Sprockets Page

You will need a connecting/master link. (Not gonna get into the clip vs. rivet debate). Most chains come with them, so you may already have one with your EK 520 GP. Also, stock chain length is 116 links. You'll want a dremel (type) tool and a moto-specific chain breaker/rivet tool to shorten your 120 link chain. Remember each outside/inside link combo counts as 2 links. Too many times have I heard of people cutting off 2 outer plates, and winding up with chain that is too short (because they actually removed 4 total links).

While you're looking for 520 sprockets, check out Gearing Commander - Motorcycle Speed and Drive Train Calculator v7 It's a pretty good site that'll let you figure out the effect of any gearing (and tire) changes you may be considering. Stock is 16/42. IME: I went with 15/42, then 15/43, but went back to 15/42 because I liked it better with the stock 190/50 tire. I'll probably go back to 15/43 when I am ready to replace the rear tire with a 190/55. (my bike only has 4,000 miles on it) Personal preference is the deciding factor. There are no "right" or "wrong" gearing combos. I've had good experiences ordering from Sprocket Center but have no vested interest, nor am I specifically endorsing them.

Good luck. Post pics and questions/results as you go along. It's not a difficult job, but takes some care and patience to do properly.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Thanks, that explains alot...more like everything about the chain.
Edit: Anyone ever use JT sprocket?
 

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Changing the front sprocket 1 tooth is similar to changing 2 teeth in the rear so a front sprocket change would be more drastic than the same change in the rear.
For the street I would strongly suggest steel sprocks VS aluminum as they will last much longer
 

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While you are at it, make sure you get a set of digital calipers to measure the width of the master link. You must press the master link so that it is the exact same width as the normal link on both ends. With a chain link pressing tool go in 1/4 turn intervals and measure the width of that master link at each interval. You also need to use the calipers to measure the amount of flare if you are using a rivet type link so be sure to get that!

The Motion Pro PBR kit is what I've used and it basically does every type of chain and rivet combination.

Cannot stress measuring enough! If you mess up you will need a new master link or worse yet it comes off on the road.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks alot for the replies and input. I ordered JT sprocket 15/42 steel ones.
Another question...do you bother with speedo healers or just check speed against a radar sign and math from there?
 

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Thanks alot for the replies and input. I ordered JT sprocket 15/42 steel ones.
Another question...do you bother with speedo healers or just check speed against a radar sign and math from there?
Is your bike an SC77?

If so a front sprocket change will not affect your speedo. Crazy I know, but the "famous for not calibrating TC/ABS/Quickshifter" SC77 ECU self calibrates the speedo o_O :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
No SC77, main reason I picked this year and model because its the last great dumb bike(in my eyes anyway). I passed up a 16sp on the showroom floor next to mine.....I still regret that one though, it was less than 2k more(should have bought both)
Edit; to be clear the 16 sp had ABS so that was the reason I picked the base model
 

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FWIW: I picked up my 2016 SP Repsol, new w/zero miles, in May of 2018 for $9995. I love it, and agree 100% with your "last great dumb bike" assessment.

I picked up a SpeedoDRD to correct my speedometer readout. It's a simple product. Found it on eBay for $65 which was less than the Healtech unit. The SpeedoDRD is tiny, and takes up almost no under-seat real estate.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So, holy crap.....did the gearing change make a difference. I knew the stock gearing was tall but it pulls all the way through now.
 

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I had the same line of thought when I made my purchase! That made me laugh...

Although I opted to try the C-ABS since my days of stuntin’ in the industrial park are just stories over cold beers mostly. This thing is a heavy beast too! Banging wheelies all evening wouldn’t be as fun. I figured a lot of the kinks are worked out. No problems yet anyway...
 
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