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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After completely reading the first extensive discussion on here i am still at a loss as to what kind of shifting produces the least amount of wear.

My girl is oldish 2004 model with 35k miles on her so have to start taking good care of her. I have never done a clutch replacement ever and would really like to try and avoid doing this or at least for as long as possibly can.

My conclusion from the first thread was:

Clutchless shifting works well if rpms are high enough when changing gears. BUT

Someone stipulated in the first thread that there is visible dogbone wear when doing clutchless shifts.

So what kind of shifting produces least amount of wear ? (Remember i am not racing the bike i want it to last i do care about the drivetrain)

Personally when i ride, it feels and sounds like there is a lot less wear when i do clutchless shifting compared to clutched shifting.

With clutch shifting it just feels like there is a lot more friction going on with every shift.

But then on the flipside everytime i do clutchless shifting i think about the guy mentioning the dogbone wear.

I'm still at a loss about which kind if shifting is best for least amount of wear on my '04 RR
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clutches are relatively cheap and easy to replace, might as well just use them up with whatever riding style you enjoy the most. :)

This is how I shift usually. Roll off the throttle and unload the drivetrain as you would clutchless, but use the clutch anyway.
Ok thanks i will use the clutch only from now on.
 

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2016 CBR1000RR
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Just to add to this…. How I shift. Not sure if it’s the most best way for the least amount of wear on drivetrain components and completely accept and welcome any input or criticism. I place a minimal amount of upward pressure on the shifter and add pressure as the rpm’s rise and I get closer to my shift point, when ready to shift add more pressure, roll off the throttle, and briefly blip the clutch lever about 1/3 of all the way in. It seems smooth and never hear any funky noises so in my mind I think it’s all good. I Could be wrong idk but that’s how I do it and have been for years on multiple different bikes (all Hondas) and haven’t had an issue. Hope that helps bruddah and if anyone can correct me on a long time habit I’d welcome and appreciate the input.
 

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2015 CBR Repsol SP
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Holding pressure against the shifter while the trans is under load is what wears the shift forks. If you’re running synthetic oil, there is little to no wear because the oil film prevents metal-metal contact unless racing and doing it very often on a crispy hot transmission.

A simple coordinated shift by slightly rolling off the throttle as you put pressure on the shifter will result in a smooth shift. If you want to really get the smooth, instant shift under load you need a quick shifter setup. They’re a couple hundred bucks and once you have it, then every bike going forward must have it.

All my bikes have a quick shifter setup. The CBR setup is from Woolich Racing.
 
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I don't have any means to actually validate this, but when I took my ARC course the instructors there were telling me that once you are higher in the RPMs, it causes more wear to use the clutch. So higher RPM shifting should be done without the clutch, while putting around town and parking lots and such you should use the clutch.
 

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...place a minimal amount of upward pressure on the shifter and add pressure as the rpm’s rise and I get closer to my shift point, when ready to shift add more pressure, roll off the throttle, and briefly blip the clutch lever about 1/3 of all the way in...
This is really good advice. In fact, Lee Parks recommends this EXACT method in his book 'Total Control' (which, BTW, EVERYONE should read!). I'll never remember the exact chapter/section, but I know it's in there somewhere 👍

Shaun
 

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2022 CBR1000RR
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This is really good advice. In fact, Lee Parks recommends this EXACT method in his book 'Total Control' (which, BTW, EVERYONE should read!). I'll never remember the exact chapter/section, but I know it's in there somewhere 👍

Shaun
This is kind of like taking up the initial travel of a two stage trigger up to the trigger wall before firing the weapon.

I do the same with my shift although it happens rapidly and the movements (take up slack in shifter, roll off throttle, shift) all overlap. This does wear the gearbox more than completely unloading it then shifting, but meh, it’s likely minimal wear if any.

I tried switching back to clutchless at the track this week and it helped a lot to minimize movements on small straights so I could focus on braking and corner entry… and it made le consider a quickshifter haha.
 

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I understand the concerns of the OP and with parts getting harder to come by, he wants to take care of his 19 year old bike. With that said, my $.02 are thus:

Clutch fiber and metal plates (collectively known as "the clutch") is a wear item and should be thought of as such, like brakes. You use them, they will wear. In fact, every time you put power to the ground, you are wearing those plates, replacement will be eventually inevitable. Fortunately, they're not that expensive and replacement doesn't take an awful lot of time, once you've done it once or twice, in fact it the longest part of the job (if all goes well) is pre-soaking the plates in an oil bath, which should be 30mins minimum.

The transmission however is not a wear item, but over time dogs will see wear. It's just the nature of things and eventually they too will require replacement. I don't know if there's any data on MTBF (mean time between failure) for them but keep in mind that Honda has sponsored endurance racing teams all over the world at the time the SC57 was developed, produced and raced so it's built to last and its part of Honda's manufacturing philosophy to make sure the machines finish the race. It's also why Hondas are still very popular among Isle of Man TT competitors, the bikes don't tend to break down.

My advice: ride and enjoy your machine frequently and as its intended. Give it proper maintenance using OE or quality aftermarket parts, clean it after use, garage it on stands between rides and it will last a long time.
 
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