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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello - I am considering the 1000RR-R Fireblade. I would like to know if the sudden change in the power band at around 7000 RPM is an issue on the track. Normally RPM's are higher on the track, but if RPM's do cross that point it seems like that could disturb the bike, particularly cornering.

I would also like to know if the US version 1st gear seems a little long as some have suggested in the Euro models. My understanding is they have 40T vs 43T (US) for '20-'21, and would like to know about the general track feel of the '20-'21 US bike as it relates to 1st gear.

Thank you!
Michael
 

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Hello - I am considering the 1000RR-R Fireblade. I would like to know if the sudden change in the power band at around 7000 RPM is an issue on the track. Normally RPM's are higher on the track, but if RPM's do cross that point it seems like that could disturb the bike, particularly cornering.

I would also like to know if the US version 1st gear seems a little long as some have suggested in the Euro models. My understanding is they have 40T vs 43T (US) for '20-'21, and would like to know about the general track feel of the '20-'21 US bike as it relates to 1st gear.

Thank you!
Michael
I will preface this by saying that I have only ridden 3 track days on the bike in stock trim before turning it into a race bike.

When riding in stock form there isn't a noticeable change in power around 7K RPM and the power feels pretty linear akin to the prior fireblade's. There is the exhaust valve that opens up around 9K RPM which is where I found a significant change in power. In race trim the power is delivered fairly linear with a smaller jump in power around 9k RPM.

In regards to first gear, I found that the stock 1st was incredibly long and I was having to shift down to 1st in many corners I would normally run in 2nd on other bikes. The drive while accelerating out of corners in 1st I felt to be quite aggressive and that initial throttle opening was also aggressive. I found that putting the power mode down to help a fair bit in regards to taming the harshness I experienced. Important to keep in mind that with the stock ecu, you cannot change the gearing or tire diameter without compromising the bikes rider aids to some extent.

My opinions anyways.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I will preface this by saying that I have only ridden 3 track days on the bike in stock trim before turning it into a race bike...
Thank you for sharing your experiences with the bike. I am considering the rr-r for track use primarily, and if it is suitable for track in stock form, and how much modification it would require. Did your bike have 40 or 43 teeth on the rear sprocket? From the Honda website, it appears US markets have 43.
 

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Thank you for sharing your experiences with the bike. I am considering the rr-r for track use primarily, and if it is suitable for track in stock form, and how much modification it would require. Did your bike have 40 or 43 teeth on the rear sprocket? From the Honda website, it appears US markets have 43.
In stock trim the bike does perform quite well on track, the wheelie control, traction control and shifter/auto-blipper all work exceptionally well. The biggest issue with the bike being a stock track bike is the inability to change the gearing and tire diameter which will cause the electronic aids to not function properly if you do end up wanting or needing to change gearing or tires. To remedy this, one would have to get an ecu flash or switch out to the kit racing ecu, I don't have any experience with the flashing so I can't offer any recommendations unfortunately. My bike came stock with 16-43, this past season I've mostly run 15-46, a final drive ratio from 2.69 to 3.07 which is a pretty drastic change, but allows for more use of the entire gearbox.
 
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