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Since the 2021 cbr 1000rr rsp was announced in November, we鈥檝e been eagerly waiting for Honda to release horsepower figures for the U.S. market, hoping it wouldn鈥檛 be far off the 215 hp claimed for the European-spec model. Thanks to VIN documentation Honda submitted to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, we can now report the American-spec CBR1000RR-R will only produce 188 hp.
While that鈥檚 a good improvement from the previous generation CBR1000RR which NHTSA filings list at 169 hp, it鈥檚 still down significantly from the Fireblade European customers will be getting. While we鈥檝e been used to seeing a power drop-off for U.S. spec models, the news is still disappointing, especially compared to bikes such as the BMW S1000RR which claims 205 hp in its NHTSA documentation
The American model kicks your ass, then it takes your name
The American model kicks your ass, then it takes your name
 

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Since the 2021 cbr 1000rr rsp was announced in November, we鈥檝e been eagerly waiting for Honda to release horsepower figures for the U.S. market, hoping it wouldn鈥檛 be far off the 215 hp claimed for the European-spec model. Thanks to VIN documentation Honda submitted to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, we can now report the American-spec CBR1000RR-R will only produce 188 hp.
While that鈥檚 a good improvement from the previous generation CBR1000RR which NHTSA filings list at 169 hp, it鈥檚 still down significantly from the Fireblade European customers will be getting. While we鈥檝e been used to seeing a power drop-off for U.S. spec models, the news is still disappointing, especially compared to bikes such as the BMW S1000RR which claims 205 hp in its NHTSA documentation:LOL:
:LOL::LOL:You realize there was a time that Honda made a specific model for California and one for the other states :LOL: :LOL:
 

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Since the 2021 cbr 1000rr rsp was announced in November, we鈥檝e been eagerly waiting for Honda to release horsepower figures for the U.S. market, hoping it wouldn鈥檛 be far off the 215 hp claimed for the European-spec model. Thanks to VIN documentation Honda submitted to the National Highway Traffic and Safety Administration, we can now report the American-spec CBR1000RR-R will only produce 188 hp.
While that鈥檚 a good improvement from the previous generation CBR1000RR which NHTSA filings list at 169 hp, it鈥檚 still down significantly from the Fireblade European customers will be getting. While we鈥檝e been used to seeing a power drop-off for U.S. spec models, the news is still disappointing, especially compared to bikes such as the BMW S1000RR which claims 205 hp in its NHTSA documentation
No, we already KNEW what the horsepower figure was going to be at the time of announcement. Honda clearly stated it was not going to be 215bhp but rather 188bhp.
We posted about this previously in a number of threads discussing the Triple-R.
 

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:LOL::LOL:You realize there was a time that Honda made a specific model for California and one for the other states :LOL: :LOL:
Does that still happen with any Hondas or other makes? I recall the reason was California's tougher emissions laws than fellow states.
 

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Does that still happen with any Hondas or other makes? I recall the reason was California's tougher emissions laws than fellow states.
I'm not sure it's common now, if it ever was. I know Honda had models specifically for California, but I believe most people just make the cars they sell across the USA compliant with CA rules.

Sometimes California increases emissions regulations, and certain political groups get upset about California making their own emissions rules. The reason those politicians get upset is most likely because most manufacturers will just make a car that meets California's rules and sell it to the rest of the country.
 

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Does that still happen with any Hondas or other makes? I recall the reason was California's tougher emissions laws than fellow states.
2017 may have been the first year that the CBR was the same for every state. California has had stricter emissions laws for quite awhile.
 
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