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Discussion Starter #1
Ok, so i’ve Lurked on here for a couple years and now I need some help. So today I got home from riding and noticed my right fork is saturated down to the axle and then the right side fairing is also covered in oil. I assume I hit a bump just right and it killed the seal. I have a 2015 1000rr. Question is what parts do I need to purchase I know everyone here recommends oem which I plan to get and do the work myself. Was hoping I could get pointers so I can order the parts then disassemble and get back together in a timely manner. I plan on doing the work myself as well, as it’s a pita but seems something I’m capable of doing. Thanks in advance!
 

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You need to purchase OEM fork seals. Do not risk it with aftermarket. I learned the hard way... Twice. Two sets of seals replaced within weeks due to leaking. Ordered a set of OEM seals and I've been riding 3k miles no problems.

You will need a fork seal driver. Use some paper or masking tape to protect fork tube from scratching. 5wt fork oil for cartridge or 10wt for OEM. A fork seal compressor is necessary for the OEM forks. You will need a friend to help or purchase a screw type compressor.

It's not hard. The most frustrating part is not using OEM seals and replacing the stupid aftermarket seals three times in one month due to leaking.

It's really hard to compress the spring enough to get the preload collar off. One trick I learned is to use some bungee cords wrapped around the bottom of the forks for extra tension as you compress it with your body weight. Good luck and whatever anyone tells you use OEM seals!
 

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Ok awesome thanks for the tips, I had read everyone says to buy oem which I generally do for parts like this anyways.

1.) So the parts in the fork I need to replace is part number “51490-MFL-003 seal set, ft. fork” and for both sides?

2.) I was going to get ohlins fluid as everyone here seems to recommend it?

3.) how much fluid do I need to buy?
 

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1. Yes, also a good idea to get a set of replacement bushings since you have to bang them together to get the fork seal out and they tend to get marred on the edges or the coating wears off.

2. Unless you're a pro, the type of fluid won't matter as long as the weight is right.

3. 500mL per fork, 1L bottle will do. You will have some left over when you suck it back out to set the oil level.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks blade so much for the info. The only forks i’ve Had to rebuild we’re on my 71 CT70 which are stupid simple in comparison so I appreciate the info.
 

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Ohlins 1309 Fluid does not work well with OEM style valves. It is rated to a specific Kinematic Viscosity that is far from the specs of any OEM fork oil. Which is also why every single week someone calls me about their Ohlins forks or Ohlins cart kit not working correctly because some idiot used non-Ohlins oil in them during a service.


Stick with either OEM fork seals or SKF if you really want to go all out. Do not use any of the cheap brands like All Ballz or Bike Master etc. As previously mentioned you will definitely need to replace the OEM Bushings/Guide at the same time.
 

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I would recommend whatever weight your service manual recommends. If you don't want to use the OEM Honda fork fluid or it is difficult to obtain etc then my go-to as a professional in the industry is Motul Fork Oil of the same spec'd weight. That is what I carry in the van for emergency fork seal replacement when working trackside on OEM forks.
 

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-No fork spring compressor needed with big piston forks.
-Oem fluid is SS47. Maxima racing blue label 7wt is extremely close to SS47 10w if you really don't want oem fluid for some reason. No, do not use SS7.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I would recommend whatever weight your service manual recommends. If you don't want to use the OEM Honda fork fluid or it is difficult to obtain etc then my go-to as a professional in the industry is Motul Fork Oil of the same spec'd weight. That is what I carry in the van for emergency fork seal replacement when working trackside on OEM forks.


i was planning on using the oem recommended fluids which i found the service manual on here, downloaded. it does recommend ss-47 so i will grab that. i play on the street not a pro racer by any means primarily seeking good reliability.


-No fork spring compressor needed with big piston forks.
-Oem fluid is SS47. Maxima racing blue label 7wt is extremely close to SS47 10w if you really don't want oem fluid for some reason. No, do not use SS7.
yeah i found the service manual and it specifies ss47 so thats what i'm going to use, i trust anything oem honda it never has let me down.

are there any good videos to watch to see the whole process? i tried googling didn't find anything good. why do i not need a spring compressor?
 

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Ohlins 1309 Fluid does not work well with OEM style valves. It is rated to a specific Kinematic Viscosity that is far from the specs of any OEM fork oil. Which is also why every single week someone calls me about their Ohlins forks or Ohlins cart kit not working correctly because some idiot used non-Ohlins oil in them during a service.


Stick with either OEM fork seals or SKF if you really want to go all out. Do not use any of the cheap brands like All Ballz or Bike Master etc. As previously mentioned you will definitely need to replace the OEM Bushings/Guide at the same time.
I guess I'm the idiot for asking... but since I had to replace the stupid aftermarket fork seals three times, I used Maxima 5wt in my NIX 30 cartridges since $35 a bottle was adding up. Is it that bad for the cartridges? At low speed compression and rebound the forks are quiet but if I quickly compress the forks (speed bump) I hear a hissing sound of the oil going through the shim stack. Is it supposed to do that?
 

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Hissing is normal to a large degree, but if you didn't use Ohlins 1309 oil in those fork you will NEVER get the forks to work in the prescribed way they are supposed to. It is just impossible to get the correct damping curves. Ohlins builds their valve specs specifically around the oil spec. Contrary to popular myth they are not just trying to sell you their expensive oil. They are insuring you get the absolute best possible performance and consistency with their products.
 

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Thats the first video in the link I posted of all the BPF videos on youtube lol
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I think my search skills are just garbage, cause I was searching like cbr1000rr fork seal replacement ect and getting some janky useless videos lol. I should have searched the model fork appearently but I also didn’t realize how many bikes use essentially the same exact fork.
 

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Hissing is normal to a large degree, but if you didn't use Ohlins 1309 oil in those fork you will NEVER get the forks to work in the prescribed way they are supposed to. It is just impossible to get the correct damping curves. Ohlins builds their valve specs specifically around the oil spec. Contrary to popular myth they are not just trying to sell you their expensive oil. They are insuring you get the absolute best possible performance and consistency with their products.
Okay so I decided to replace the fork oil. And. . . what a surprise the adjusters actually make a huge difference now!

I mistakenly thought the "No. 5" on the bottle meant the same as 5wt. Viscosity was way different when I looked up the viscosity values. 16cSt for my old oil and 19cSt for the Ohlins.

Thanks for the heads up. Definitely will not make the same mistake in the future.
 
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