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Discussion Starter #41
I rode another 258 miles today, and was home at 12:45!

I went to a road with a friend of mine that I seldom rode my Ducati on because it’s a long ride for these SuperSports. But it’s a road with a lot of good curves for what I would guess is about 20 miles. For those in the Houston area, it is 3090 up near Anderson.

The road is basically well paved with a great variety of curves. But it is a very rough road in many places. We ran the road one direction at a moderate but fun pace. Then we turned around and ran it the other way, and I got a little more aggressive in the curves and accelerating out of them.

That actually taught me more about the bike. Three times while accelerating off apexes I hit some fairly rough parts of pavement while still leaned over. I was very impressed at how well the shocks reacted. The bike maintained good traction, and there were no after shocks. They did exactly what shocks are designed to do, maintain contact with the pavement.

I am definitely more and more impressed with the bike as I rack up the miles. I’m now around 530 miles. Not bad for owning it six days now and today is the first day with no rain in the area! I love the bike!
 

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Discussion Starter #43
Great posts! I’m an older rider too by most people’s standards (turning 50 in NOV) and I loved reading about your experience. It makes me smile knowing there are older guys out there still enjoying the sport bike experience in their later years, and living life to the fullest! You are simply a bad ass in my eyes, and thank you much for sharing. 👍
Trust me when I tell you that I know how fortunate I am to still be able to do the things I do. I appreciate your kind words. My mom and dad are/we're my heros. My dad lived a great life until 90. My mom is 95 and is amazing beyond words.
 

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Yeah, I’m fortunate too. Both parents still living, and my grandmother on my mom’s side is still kicking at 93. My grandfather was 93 when he passed, and still sharp as a tack! Anyway, I am still serving in Active Army and remain on HALO and Static Line jump status...which is considered kind of crazy at almost 50 😂, but I refuse to slow down. I maintain my weight and balance good cardio with weight training for muscle and bone strength. I simply don’t feel my age for the most part, and I love being proficient and the unexpected. Anyway, keep at it and thanks for the updated posts. Sounds like you are really starting to enjoy the CBR!
 

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Hmmmm, Japanese Powersports and German cars. You have some explaining to do ;). I have a 2017 540 M-Sport. My close friend I ride with every week has a 2020 M8 Gran Coupe Competition and his wife's car is a 2020 911S. I've been a huge car guy all my life too.
Don't know why but I've been attracted to BMWs all my life, just loved how the Bavarians tuned their exhaust note.
Having said that, the throttle response from my 1.5K miles 15 year old CBR1000RR was heart-stopping, even compared to my 2018 M3 Competition.
There's no comparison doing 0-60MPH in sub-three seconds without a cage.
 
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I wonder how the CBR felt going on Southwest Freeway, I-10 and I-45. I lived in Houston for around 10 years in the late '80s and I know the cars + trucks are a little crazy on the freeways of Houston. Does it feel stable with all the side-winds?

Also, how do you guys handle the heat in Houston riding with all the protective gears?
 

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I wonder how the CBR felt going on Southwest Freeway, I-10 and I-45. I lived in Houston for around 10 years in the late '80s and I know the cars + trucks are a little crazy on the freeways of Houston. Does it feel stable with all the side-winds?
I don't know about 10 or 45 as I haven't taken the SP2 any where near the Freeways and stick to back roads religiously.

As for side winds, I have done testing at my secret magic mile location and its a north-south road. With a 3-5mph cross wind the bike is super stable except for when the road camber plays havoc and then its time shut 'er down as stability is a disadvantage when drifting towards a drainage ditch LOL :ROFLMAO::LOL:

 

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Huh ... you "cheated" by transporting your bike to the country roads. :ROFLMAO:

Yea, I experienced the same side-winds thingy on I-90 here in the NW.
 

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Awesome write up!

So we have the same bike. I picked mine up about a month ago, but I've barely put 600 miles on it lol.

Couple of things I wanted to comment on as I was reading through the thread:

1. Mid Range. For me, this bike is the replacement for a 2006 CBR1000RR, and compared to the '06, the 2018 has a much weaker mid range, and a substantially weaker low end (unless there is something wrong with my bike!). I ride 100% on the street, and I feel the power band on this bike is designed completely for the track. In any case, once you get above 7k, this thing is a rocket. Even short-shifting 1st at 7-8k, and giving it hell shifiting into 2nd is bonkers. Or taking 2nd up to the redline and shifting into 3rd with full throttle...it's intoxicating. I can't believe how hard it pulls considering it's relative lack of power.

2. The exhaust sound, even with the OEM can, is incredible. It's not very loud...quiet at idle...but the sound is just awesome. And it gets loud in the upper range. Probably one of my favorite aspects of this bike is hearing it open up on the freeway. I'm hesitant to put an aftermarket can on it for that very reason. I like the sound of the OEM too much.

3. I, too, had issues with the torque control. I thought I had a dirty air filter or bad plug at one point, because the bike almost felt like it was hesitating. Once I figured out the issue, though, that promptly went away.

4. If you haven't figured out the tank cover yet, once you remove all 4 bolts, there are, in fact, little tabs, one on each side under the 'tank grip' parts, that kind of hook inside the frame. So while you pull up on the cover, just press inward on each side of the tank where the leg grips are and it'll pop right off.

5. I waited 300 miles before I really got on it. Did the initial oil change, then headed for the twisties. I feel like the engine may not have been completely broken in at 300 miles, or even 400 miles. Now that I'm around 600, the bike feels like it pulls much harder through the entire rev range, and I can only attribute that everything finally being seated. Or maybe it's just placebo?

6. I'd say my only real gripes with the bike are the seat (but who buys these things for the seat??), and the lack of low/mid power. And even those aren't 'bad' things. This bike is a great package, even if we have the absolute base trim (I also do not have ABS or the quick-shifter). It's light, it's fast, looks great, Honda build quality and reliability, sounds amazing, handles like a dream...there is a lot to like about this bike!

I do have one question for you - once your bike is at operating temperature, does it seem to have a slight amount of lope in the idle? My bike had a lot of lope initially and I learned it was due to the battery terminals not being secured tight enough. I torqued them down and that made it much better, but I still feel like it idles slightly off. Do you notice that with yours at all?

Shaun
 

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@sketterman the motor itself is capable producing substantially more torque and horsepower across the rev range with peak power in unrestricted form coming in at 12,000rpm.

If your ECU is still stock, power peaks at 10,500rpm and is 20hp lower than advertised.

The reason you feel the bike is lacking in low or mid range is because the throttle is literally capped until 6,500 rpm in gears 1 through 3 in all power modes and even more so in P4 and P5.

All 5 power modes have the throttle pull back to 73% from 10,400rpm to redline.

I hate that your impression of the bike is so skewed by the severe throttle restrictions in place on the US bike in order to meet US DOT noise restrictions.

Understand the bike as intended and designed by Honda is very different from the one we buy in the USA.

Luckily experiencing the same performance the Europeans and Australians do is just an ECU update away.

That idle lope is really due to the aggressive nature of the stock cams - they are only slightly softer than the HRC kit cams.
 

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@sketterman
The reason you feel the bike is lacking in low or mid range is because the throttle is literally capped until 6,500 rpm in gears 1 through 3 in all power modes and even more so in P4 and P5.

All 5 power modes have the throttle pull back to 73% from 10,400rpm to redline.

I hate that your impression of the bike is so skewed by the severe throttle restrictions in place on the US bike in order to meet US DOT noise restrictions.
I've read about this...or saw a video on Youtube or whatever...didnt actually think it was the case though.

So I guess the only way to get full potential is to flash the ECU? It's unfortunate that they would handicap it so much. But that would explain why it seems to completely change at around 6-7k. It becomes a completely different bike.

I was telling some of my buddies that it feels like a 600, where you have to really wind it out to get anything out of it.

Shaun
 

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I've read about this...or saw a video on Youtube or whatever...didnt actually think it was the case though.

So I guess the only way to get full potential is to flash the ECU? It's unfortunate that they would handicap it so much. But that would explain why it seems to completely change at around 6-7k. It becomes a completely different bike.

I was telling some of my buddies that it feels like a 600, where you have to really wind it out to get anything out of it.

Shaun
Pretty much the difference between the stock US ECU and the derestricted ECU is like stepping of a fast 750 and onto a liter bike for the first time/

All of the flexibility and power in shaping and tuning the behavior of the bike rests in the fly-by-wire electronic throttle. Your right wrist dials in an amount of throttle, the ECU will instruct the throttle body butterfly valves to open as much as determined by the ETV tables. Honda's philosophy is to only provide enough power to move forward as fast as possible wasting as little power on wheelies or wheel spin.

But of course this very same flexibility in controlling the throttle allows them to hold back power (in this case to limit noise) at certain points in the power band creating an artificially weaker/slower bike. However this is also what allows the bike to have push button power output levels than have different throttle opening profiles to provide very different power personalities at the push of a button.
 

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Pretty much the difference between the stock US ECU and the derestricted ECU is like stepping of a fast 750 and onto a liter bike for the first time/
So not to derail the OP's thread...hoping they are as interested in this as I am...but does re-flashing the ECU to remove this limit pose any threat to engine longevity? Would I be risking damaging anything? I'm going to look this up for cost...very curious to see what this bike is like without the restrictions.

Shaun
 
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