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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Bought a 2005 CBR1000RR (1,350 miles) less than a month ago. Cleaned it, replaced all fluids and going to replace parts to factory specs. Drove it around and absolutely loved it. Even with this 15 year old technology, it still felt like a rocket with limitless torque. But, I'm now craving for all the electronics in the newer models. The leftover new 2018's are priced attractively. Is it worth it?
 

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Bought a 2005 CBR1000RR (1,350 miles) less than a month ago. Cleaned it, replaced all fluids and going to replace parts to factory specs. Drove it around and absolutely loved it. But, I'm now craving for all the electronics in the newer models. The leftover new 2018's are priced attractively. Is it worth it?
Yes.
 

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We're a tad biased, but yes, they're seriously underrated bikes. Paradoxically, the SP is probably the better all purpose bike, if I could swing a second I'd get a base model for a track bike build.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I thought SP is even more so for track than street?
 

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I thought SP is even more so for track than street?
Sort of - yes and no.

Its a Honda and homologation thing mixed in with marketing hype.

The SP (and the SP2) has Ohlins and Brembo that for certain regions stock class racing bikes have to run the wheels, brake calipers and rotors of the stock bike as well as the stock fork outers.

But the intent for pure racing purposes is to ditch the electronic part of the Ohlins and use the SBK Cartridge Kit to up the forks to SuperBike spec and replace the shock - this is a $4500 upgrade cost to actually make the SP/SP2 suspension ready for SuperStock racing.

So in that respect the cheaper base model is a better starting point if you are going spend money on upgrade parts anyway.

But on the street the "race ready" SP and SP2 appear cooler I suppose. :unsure:
 

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Sort of. With the ECS you can change between track/fast road/comfort settings and can tweak very easily, within certain parameters, so you can use comfort mode to get down the highway to go fast time, switch it up with a button to stiffen things up and bump the power, then turn it all back down after, it's actually a very comfortable bike for distances that way.

Like RC said, if you're building a proper track bike, you junk all of it anyway, so a base is the way to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I see ... very educational.

I'm looking for a 2018 street CBR and I don't want to spend the $$$ for a SP class CBR --- it's over what I want to spend. Besides, owing to the much smaller production volume for SP's, I don't see any leftovers for 2018. If there are any, they are in the used market.

So, I'll stick with base.
I'm assuming that I can upgrade to Ohlin options later if I want to or is the Ohlin tied to the ECU programming?
 

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I see ... very educational.

I'm looking for a 2018 street CBR and I don't want to spend the $$$ for a SP class CBR --- it's over what I want to spend. Besides, owing to the much smaller production volume for SP's, I don't see any leftovers for 2018. If there are any, they are in the used market.

So, I'll stick with base.
I'm assuming that I can upgrade to Ohlin options later if I want to or is the Ohlin tied to the ECU programming?
Upgrade to ohlins is simple.
Buy ohlins ECS, buy SP wiring harness and SCU, I flash you ECU to SP spec and your done.

The trick will be finding the Ohlins ECS and SP harness at a reasonable price, but it can be done.
But based on today's street prices it would be cheaper to buy a used SP

But in 3 or 4 years it may be cheaper to buy the used Ohlins ECS

But going with the base/ABS and a decent ECU flash will give a kick ass bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I was just looking at the Torque/Power curves of the 2018, did they tune the Base towards high RPM? Is it still a torquey bike for lower RPMs or is it now like the Yamaha R6 (useless for the street)?
My 2005 has a really bulgy torque curve in the front end for street.
 

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I was just looking at the Torque/Power curves of the 2018, did they tune the Base towards high RPM? Is it still a torquey bike for lower RPMs or is it now like the Yamaha R6 (useless for the street)?
My 2005 has a really bulgy torque curve in the front end for street.
Which market curves?
If you see a Honda graph it is of the de-restricted Euro bike and the stock North American bike behaves nothing like the power curve suggests it should.

The base, ABS and SP all use exactly the same engine and tune. The US/Canada tune is orientated towards passing emissions requirements (sound and polluting gases)

The reality is that even if the 2005 was torquier at low rpm compared to the 2017/18/19 you will struggle to use it all.

Where as with the SC77 the power delivery is shaped and managed by the ETV table profile. And thats how I have a P1 that seriously challenges good riders, P2 that is really strong all the way down to a P5 rain mode that allows you safely ride in very wet conditions.

That's the beauty and value of the electronic bikes.
 

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Now wait a minute......I love my 05......are we splitting hairs on performance for the street????
If you are going for all out track performance, do all of the above...if that's really what you are after.....but get your big wallet out!!!
259279
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Now wait a minute......I love my 05......are we splitting hairs on performance for the street????
If you are going for all out track performance, do all of the above...if that's really what you are after.....but get your big wallet out!!!
View attachment 259279
No, I'm just exploring the useable torque on the street between the two (2005 vs 2018).
When I call on the torque, I want it to be there. I'm not into the late arriving torque at 13,000 RPM. Not going to the track.
 

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No, I'm just exploring the useable torque on the street between the two (2005 vs 2018).
When I call on the torque, I want it to be there. I'm not into the late arriving torque at 13,000 RPM. Not going to the track.
You have seen my video of the tire breakign loose and the front wheel lifting at 5500rpm right?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You have seen my video of the tire breakign loose and the front wheel lifting at 5500rpm right?
No, what do you mean?
You are scaring me. :ROFLMAO:
 

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I thought SP is even more so for track than street?
A bike released as a street legal (i.e. not track only) is not going to have the TOTL racing components because most of the time these components are not compatible with street use. For instance, the Ohlins superbike gas charged forks require service every 10 hours of use, true Brembo Racing mono-blocks need very frequent rebuilds because there's no dust seals, etc.

Another consideration is that bike specific Ohlins electronic suspension has very poor resale value (low demand vs. 30mm/25mm kits), so if you do end up "upgrading" again you won't get much out of them.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Good to know. Thanks!
 

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A bike released as a street legal (i.e. not track only) is not going to have the TOTL racing components because most of the time these components are not compatible with street use. For instance, the Ohlins superbike gas charged forks require service every 10 hours of use, true Brembo Racing mono-blocks need very frequent rebuilds because there's no dust seals, etc.

Another consideration is that bike specific Ohlins electronic suspension has very poor resale value (low demand vs. 30mm/25mm kits), so if you do end up "upgrading" again you won't get much out of them.
Luckily the Ohlins ECS that comes on the SC77 has a SuperBike spec FKR100 upgrade cartidge. That is the fork used for SuperStock racing the SP/SP2.

So the upgrade path is a natural one if done correctly. Same with the Brembo calipers. FIM SuperStock rules require the actual stock caliper be used - they just upgrade to Ti pistons and braided lines and go race.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Do the brakes on the Base 2018 CBR come with a dust-cover?
 
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