Honda CBR 1000RR Forums banner

1 - 20 of 157 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Being inspired by some of the notable build threads on this forum, I thought that I'd also take to the medium to document and share my work on my 2006 CBR1000RR and that hopefully I might inform as well as entertain others as well as create a history for the bike.


Many of the posts will be reverie until I catch up to present time. Fortunately, I've posted or shared pics with friends and family in various places and can retrieve many of them but I apologize in advance if I happen to post anything out of time sequence. I'll try to correct that with a narrative.


I hope you guys will be inclined to subscribe as I begin to fill this thread with content.
 

·
MYAAH!
Joined
·
991 Posts
Lookin forward to the progress :)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Post #5 should be copy/paste as follows:

Sorry for the delayed updates guys, I'm having a problem setting up Photobucket on my work computer- I might actually have to do it at home, imagine that!

At least I can provide this tidbit from my TALES FROM THE GARAGE
(edit 7/30/2017- this image added for dramatic effect, but it is my image- it’s my custom designed fairings arrived to my front door…er…garage)


Last night I took one of my (cheap) chain tools out of it's misery. and it's a shame too...stupid me decided to use the tool with a bent pin - thought I could get away with it and I snapped the tool's steel U-shaped part using my impact wrench. It's trash now. Glad I have my Motion Pro- even with one of the anvil's broken (I don't think I need that anyway- but I can order a new one).

After breaking the chain free - I removed the front sprocket and sprayed the area with Powersports Simple Green (it's not green in color) and let it drip into my oil catch pan. Tonight I'll take a rag to the area and clean it properly - there's chain gunk there and I've never been able to clean it properly until now, which is why it's on my task list.

After riveting the chain back on (hopefully tonight) I'll be done with the truly mechanical work on the bike and then it's just a little electrical wiring, bodywork and other aesthetic bits.






Last night I took one of my (cheap) chain tools out of it's misery. and it's a shame too...stupid me decided to use the tool with a bent pin - thought I could get away with it and I snapped the tool's steel U-shaped part using my impact wrench. It's trash now. Glad I have my Motion Pro- even with one of the anvil's broken (I don't think I need that anyway- but I can order a new one).

After breaking the chain free - I removed the front sprocket and sprayed the area with Powersports Simple Green (it's not green in color) and let it drip into my oil catch pan. Tonight I'll take a rag to the area and clean it properly - there's chain gunk there and I've never been able to clean it properly until now, which is why it's on my task list.

After riveting the chain back on (hopefully tonight) I'll be done with the truly mechanical work on the bike and then it's just a little electrical wiring, bodywork and other aesthetic bits.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Tonight I wanted to clean the sticky, icky from my front sprocket area. I allocated .5hrs to do the job and it took 1.25. Spent too much time on this task than I wanted, but I'm satisfied with the cleanup under the sprocket cover. The remaining splashes are water that will be left to air dry.


Another 20 or so minutes was spent using a sanding wheel on the sprocket cover plate to remove the bits of gasket, then I covered it with some spray hi-temp black paint I had lying around.

I'll get the swingarm and chain guide in the next cleaning evolution

This area was ultra ugly.


I wish I knew what type of chain wax the previous owner used, so I'll know not to use it.

I cleaned up the sprocket bolt and installed the front Driven (brand)520 sprocket. My previous appeared to be OEM #530 chain. A Driven is on the rear also, but I'm sticking with OEM ratios.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Considering that I'd forgotten to Loctite the rear brake rotor bolts, I did that tonight also. Again, cleanup will be in future tasks. A resupply of Brake Cleaner is also on the shopping list.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
As can be seen by my task list, I need to revise my time estimates because I've put in about 4x more time on each task than listed. I tend to take my time, disassemble and clean things...and sometimes I just need to get more information on how to do a task.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Unable to get any tasks done on Friday due to a funeral, I was wiped out after a long day of travel. After another long day of running errands with family, I didn't want to let Saturday pass without getting anything done, so regardless of the time, I got started at about 12:30a (Sunday morning). I set my sights on cleaning the inside of the swingarm (the area where the tire runs) and doing the rear brake pads. Shouldn't take too long by my reckoning. After that was done I felt good about finding a solution for my rear brake light switch. I have a pressure switch there and had not made the electrical connection because I felt the wiring was too short and I didn't want to do the job below my personal satisfaction.

One thing that I've learned working on my own bike: You develop a way of doing things and it may be functional and may please others, but you're the biggest critic of your own handiwork.

I found my (thought was lost) wire stripper and test fit things together and since it looked good, I decided to have a go. I had to remove the rearset to get adequate hand space but it worked out well, with some black heat shrink tubing covering everything. I didn't shrink it down because I thought, "what for? that area of the bike gets hot enough and it'll do the trick but if not, then it gives me a 2nd shot if testing proves faulty". I didn't want to actuate the rear brake with the wheel not yet installed considering that I have the new pads installed and a new rotor and I'll need all the clearance I can get. Did I say that I don't like installing rear wheels? Well, I don't, but it's a necessary evil.

I needed to remove the bolts for my rearsets that bolt to the frame to bust some rust - must have been a galvanic response but some black hi-temp paint after a little bit of elbow grease and that was done for 3 of the 4 bolts. The 4th wanted to be stubborn and broke off the ball end of my Allen wrench (SOB!). So I need to retrieve it and do the 4ht bolt and then call that task complete.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Well, I got started this afternoon. It's pretty hot outside and since I had double duty of Mr. mom, I let my 4yo ride his bicycle and my wife was gracious enough to take the other 2 and run some errands.

First task was to reinstall the rear wheel. The inner spacer that moves around inside the wheel is anoyying but eventually I got the axle through only to realize that I forgot to mount the brake caliper. After taking the axle back out, the left spacer fell off and so did the hub.

The sprocket probably fell on a tooth, right on the joiner for one of the cush drive rubbers and cut it into two pieces. No problem (I thought), I have another set of rubbers from the F4i. Except they are of a slightly different design. So, as luck would have it, I'm dead in the water (on that task) until I replace it. And just in case they're dry rot and overly hardened, I may as well procure a new set. Would be nice if I could get them local. I'll call the Honda dealer tomorrow and see if they have them in stock - doubt it, but worth a shot.


See next post...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
So I picked up my disappointment and decided to install my Puig light smoke windscreen. I planned to reclaim the rubber grommets from the OEM windscreen. I think Puig may have drilled the holes about .05mm larger than Honda did, because I had to fuss to get them to stay. After patiently getting them bolted up to the new upper fairing they seemed to stay in place. So, I'll call that task done.

This is a stock photo from Puig- as I haven't decided yet how I'm going to do the reveal on my custom paint scheme

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
I also happen to be waiting for one of these guys; turns out that I do need it, so says the instructions now available on their website.

As I broke my original about a decade ago. It was my first chain job, this is my second...I hope it goes better
For this tool

It looking doubtful that I'll make Bike night this week, but I'll keep pushing.

After it cools down tonight and the children are in bed, I'll put in a little more work.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #14 (Edited)
What’s cracking folks? I figured I’d get started with showing some of the prior updates listed in my sig before I started this thread and try and bring it up to date.


I had no idea what maintenance was done to the bike by the previous owner other than what I could see, and it had about 15,000 miles on the odometer.




A month after purchase, the first thing to be done was a fluid change.
This included oil, front and rear brake fluid and clutch fluid. For hydraulics, I typically prefer Valvoline Synpower as I’ve had good results with it and it’s not too expensive.



The shop owner of the new shop I sent it to convinced me to try Engine Ice

And I’d say, so far so good on the performance of Engine Ice. I plan to keep it in the bike until the end of this season, so it will have 1-1/2 seasons on it at changeout. I think it will be fine.


This is a shot of what came out of the bike:



I don’t have a shot of what we did for motor oil but it was a brand that I don’t usually use which I was okay with. The spark plugs were also changed as per the Maintenance Schedule; we put NGK (OEM brand) in there- I don't mess around with spark plugs as I've learned they are NOT all created equal.


The Air Filter was replaced with a Bikemaster. Next time I'll go with the OEM filter.

These were the brakes as they came upon purchase. They were fine and I ran them until recently, as I'm now doing the update.



The tire pressures were checked, it had a State inspection (more on that later) and it was deemed legally roadworthy.
 

·
MYAAH!
Joined
·
991 Posts
Lookin good! Can't wait too see how it looks on the reveal
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Today I got the Upper Fairing swapped since I had some time before it was time to get ready for 4th of July festivities. While at it, I also got the new set of mirrors mounted. Mirrors...I have a love/hate relationship with them; I can't seem to find a set I'm truly happy with and when I do, I somehow manage to break, scratch or otherwise damage them. Seemingly simple part, right, but I don't think I've ever purchased the same brand twice in all my years of motorcycle ownership.

The good news is that it's starting to look like a motorcycle again. To look more like a motorcycle, I need to mount the side and lower fairings, and rear wheel. At bit more functional work will be required in the interim, but at least it will look like a bike. I'm still following my planned order of tasks (forthemostpart) with exceptions listed above where I'm waiting on parts or tools.

I'm also much passed the point where I need to make some design decisions about a few small parts, like bolts and such. I've been going with OEM, replacing what's been substandard but it would have been more cost effective with a clearer plan for using color anodized pieces in a few strategic places. I thought I'd have that figured out by now, but I don't and since I recently snapped the head off a nylon bolt it's going to be painful to pay shipping on about a $3 order for parts- I've been making USPS/UPS rich lately. smh.
 

·
Whatever, Let's Ride
Joined
·
236 Posts
I also happen to be waiting for one of these guys; turns out that I do need it, so says the instructions now available on their website.

As I broke my original about a decade ago. It was my first chain job, this is my second...I hope it goes better
For this tool

It looking doubtful that I'll make Bike night this week, but I'll keep pushing.

After it cools down tonight and the children are in bed, I'll put in a little more work.
You're going to love that tool...I know I do.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I hope this 2nd job with it goes well.
 

·
Whatever, Let's Ride
Joined
·
236 Posts
I hope this 2nd job with it goes well.
May or may not be obvious, but be sure to grease your master link pins before pressing.

Don't over-press your master link pins. I actually use my digital calipers to compare the pin heads to those in the rest of the chain. I press lightly at first, then repeat progressively until I've reached the right measurement. Over-press will cause binding in the chain.

Definitely eyesight-measure your chain before cutting...if you cut too short, you just wasted a chain. If you cut too long, you won't leave yourself enough future adjustment for chain-stretch before the adjusters run out of room. I use a trick with a jaw/jaw turnbuckle (link below) to make I to get best measurement. You'll see what I'm talking about as soon as you look at the turnbuckle.

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Everbilt-1-2-in-x-6-in-Galvanized-Jaw-and-Jaw-Turnbuckle-44244/205874127
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,502 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Thanks for the words of advice. The master link came bathed in a packet of grease and I plan to keep it there until just before installation. Thanks for the reminder about using a caliper to measure the thickness.


Since I'm going with stock gear ratios, but just a 520 conversion, the stock 114 links should work fine- I plan to count them just in case I didn't get the correct item.


Side note: I've heard of people doing 2 master links because they cut too short. If that happened to me: 1) I wouldn't put them side-side and 2) I'll prevent #1 by counting and double counting
 
1 - 20 of 157 Posts
Top