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If you pull off the hose going from the reservoir to the master cylinder and remove the plastic cap, you see the hole(s). Normally, when you let go of the lever, the seal just barely uncovers that hole so that when you go to pull the lever there's minimal slack in building up fluid pressure.

Glad you went with the lines. Never tried Spiegler lines myself, but always check with suspension fully extended that it doesn't pull on the line, especially if you have a suspension where adding preload makes the fully extended length longer due to top-out spring. Left should be 28 inches right should be 25 inches for your year bike.
Thanks for this馃檶馃徑
 

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'18 CBR1000RR SP
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I changed the OEM lines to Galfer stainless steel (ss) for my tiny Ninja 250R and the front brakes felt like it was, at least, 20% stiffer.
Longevity of ss lines is well known for motorcycles and cars.
There's one downside to ss lines, you need to make sure they are never kinked or constricted.

SavageGeese did a nice summary on brake lines which I learned some new information.
 

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'18 CBR1000RR SP
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So, going back to the original issue of the stacked brakes, I have a question: our bikes have 2 front calipers, were they both stuck or just one?
 

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'18 CBR1000RR SP
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After reading the whole thread, it looked like the MC replacement fixed it.
What exactly is the root cause?
  • fluid age
  • rubber-based MC internals need to be replaced
  • debris blockage
  • others?
Question: Are there any maintenance we can do to prevent this from even happening in the first place?

Looks like there was no tell-tale sign or hints that it was about to fail and then it happened suddenly. Service Manual did mention about Brake System inspection every 8K miles, apart from measuring pads & disc thickness and replacing fluids.
 

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'18 CBR1000RR SP
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A while back, a local guy posted a story about a ride when he went to brake hard and the bike endo-ed. He didn't think he braked hard enough for that to happen.

Some people speculated it was due to old brake fluid with to much moisture. During his ride, the brake got hot and at that particular hard stop something boiled, expanded, and locked the brakes.

So.. what are people's thought on this theory? BS? could be true?

could it just be old brake fluid?
I'm a believer of being on time with brake fluid replacement.

Here's something that explained a little more about brake fluids and how it deteriorates and compromise the entire brake system:
Contaminated brake fluid
Brake fluid contamination is more common than most techs or their customers realize. Brake fluid contains alcohol, and it absorbs moisture even in a sealed system. Seams in the steel brake line are brazed with a copper alloy, and as moisture content in the brake fluid increases, the copper corrodes and dissolves in the fluid. Over time it attacks the rubber seals, and tiny passages may become clogged as the rubber deteriorates. This is why many car manufacturers recommend flushing the brake fluid semi-annually.
2 years schedule to replace brake fluid (and clutch for our case) is the least.
I think track users should change it more frequently since they heat up the entire system a lot more and a tiny amount of moisture would have lowered the boiling point from factory specs.
 

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2015 Honda CBR 1000rr non ABS
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For the cheap cost of a bottle of brake fluid (for those knowledgeable enough to know using over the counter every day brake fluid is ample for 99% of us $3 valvoline synpower Dot 3/4) and the little time it takes to bleed in new fluid (not including older Abs models) I do it every spring along with cleaning the calipers and verifying all the caliper pistons are free and in working order with no leaks.
Cheap insurance is the way I look at it
 

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[..]
Cheap insurance is the way I look at it
After reading this thread, I have put on scheduled maintenance to flush brake fluids every year now. That is significantly less expensive than overhauling a MC or caliper or replace them. And, worst, brake failing in the middle of the road.
 

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For the cheap cost of a bottle of brake fluid (for those knowledgeable enough to know using over the counter every day brake fluid is ample for 99% of us $3 valvoline synpower Dot 3/4) and the little time it takes to bleed in new fluid (not including older Abs models) I do it every spring along with cleaning the calipers and verifying all the caliper pistons are free and in working order with no leaks.
Cheap insurance is the way I look at it
I think this is really good advice, which I personally have never followed. In the passed, I waited until the fluid color was noticeably changed.

However, 2105HRC's logic makes sense. doing a full replacement of break fluid takes probably a bit more time than you wait for the oil to drain out of the engine when doing an oil change.

So open the oil drain bolt, and flush the brake fluid while the oil is coming out.

I'll tell you if next spring if my lazy ass follows through with this plan.
 

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2015 Honda CBR 1000rr non ABS
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With a car sometimes I will put off fluid changes or maintenance crap but with a bike and the increased risks to my health and life involved I would rather be safe than sorry.
I can change all the fluids (oil, coolant, brake), check tire pressure and chain slack/alignment, and clean my brake calipers/pads/rotors in around 1.5 hours. Unfortunetly here in Michigan we have plenty of time for these types of things in the form of 5 months of unrideable winter weather
 

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2005 CBR1000rr
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Discussion Starter · #54 · (Edited)
Wow, I missed a lot of responses somehow. Great conversation and recommendations.
I have ridden the bike several times on 60 mile rides since I rebuilt the MC.....no problems, brakes are fine.

Just a review....I did a complete rebuild of the MC and cleaned everything out with spray cleaner when I had the MC apart. Obviously completely new brake fluid in the system as well.

I can't tell if the original lock up was was both calipers or not, the front wheel would not turn at all. After about 20 minutes I was able to roll the bike.

I did get new braided lines, based on the previous recommendation about corrosion from the steel fittings. I have some new clamps on order. Waiting for them to install the new lines. I replaced the brake pads not long ago
, so I don't think the caliper pistons are the problem, but I may recheck them again when I do the lines.
259540
 

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Just a warning... I have a 2010 CBR1000RR front end installed on my RGV250. It is a complete front-end including triple clamps, clip-ons and switchgear. I used an aftermarket brake lever that caused the front end to lock solid.
The hole in the lever was not big enough for the m/c nipple to go all the way in so the lever was never being allowed to fully release. Luckily I wasn't going fast at the time.
Make sure that master cylinder nipple/plunger seats fully into the brake lever. An after marker lever might have the wrong depth to allow the m/c to work properly
 

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'18 CBR1000RR SP
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Just a warning... I have a 2010 CBR1000RR front end installed on my RGV250. It is a complete front-end including triple clamps, clip-ons and switchgear. I used an aftermarket brake lever that caused the front end to lock solid.
The hole in the lever was not big enough for the m/c nipple to go all the way in so the lever was never being allowed to fully release. Luckily I wasn't going fast at the time.
Make sure that master cylinder nipple/plunger seats fully into the brake lever. An after marker lever might have the wrong depth to allow the m/c to work properly
Good warning, thanks for the heads-up.
 

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Just a warning... I have a 2010 CBR1000RR front end installed on my RGV250. It is a complete front-end including triple clamps, clip-ons and switchgear. I used an aftermarket brake lever that caused the front end to lock solid.
The hole in the lever was not big enough for the m/c nipple to go all the way in so the lever was never being allowed to fully release. Luckily I wasn't going fast at the time.
Make sure that master cylinder nipple/plunger seats fully into the brake lever. An after marker lever might have the wrong depth to allow the m/c to work properly
That's the importance of the front brake lever free play adjustment.
 

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I may be mistaken since I haven't used Spiegler lines myself, but are you sure you have the banjo's on the master cylinder stacked in the right order? Normally banjo on the bottom is angled more than the one on top so they overlap perfectly. Like this.
259655
 
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