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I'm doing a write up to hopefully help anyone wanting to do this project as I could not find much help for myself. I would rate this project about a 6 out of 10 for difficulty mainly because if you are not careful, there are some serious things that you could miss which I will point out. As for me, I have never been inside of the engine before so this was quite intimidating going into it but once started, if you have the right tools is pretty straight forward.

My installation was based on the instructions provided and several emails to Yoyodyne for clarification. I can't be 100% sure that everything I did was correct so please verify the steps for yourself as this is just a guide to give you an idea if you feel like it is something you would like to try yourself which you do at your own risk. Also read the service manual as a backup because they often specify specific ways to remove things. If anyone spots any errors in my writeup, please let me know so I can correct them.

First we have the patient. My 2006 1000RR track bike looking at the clutch cover. If you are wondering why I have an engine mount bold missing, I had to remove my No cut frame slider.



Before we start, I bought a brand new clutch pack with new springs to install and laid them out in stock order. There are two different friction plates (6,7) and two different steel plates (8,22). When put together in oem order, they will look like this: 6,22,7,8,7,8,7,8,7,8,7,8,7,8,6 and that is how they are in this picture. You can see the first and last cluch plate (6) is thinner than the others (7). We will change the order when installing them per instructions from Yoyodynes Website.



Next, we add some engine oil to prelubricate all the parts. I just poured it over the stack and rotated the stack while tilting the pan to make sure everything gets covered. I didn't want to run them dry.



Next we remove all the clutch cover bolts. You don't have to drain the oil as no oil will be lost when you take the cover off.

 

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Use a large flathead screwdriver to pry the cover off. There are tabs on the cover you can use to pry. When you take off the cover (or before) unplug the wire at the red connector



This is your first Gotcha if you are not careful. The thrust washer on mine was stuck to the inside of the cover as you can see if you look closely at the previous picture of the cover being removed. In the next picture I slide it over so you can see where it is. If you don't notice it, it could fall off and you might miss putting it back.



I forgot to take pictures here but if you look up one picture, I remove the five bolts and springs and remove the pressure plate. One the pressure plate is removed, you can use two small flat head screw drivers and start removing the clutch plates and metal plates. Keep them in order because if they are in good shape you may want to keep them.

Here is the next Gotcha! When you get to the last clutch plate, the Judder springs are inside of this plate. Note the order they are installed. The flat one is inside and the sloped one is after with the slope facing in toward the bike.





Remove the Judder springs and place them inside your first new clutch disk that we kept in OEM order and in the correct order you removed them.

Next remove the cap in the very center that is on the end of the rod the disengages the clutch and put it in a safe place.



You are now looking at the large nut you will need to remove. Notice it is locked in place with a recess. I used a very small flatblade to lift this out as much as possible.

 

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I used a clutch holder and an impact wrench to remove the nut which made this very easy. If you don't have these two tools, I can't offer you much help here with alternate ways to remove this nut but I hear it is a pain.



When you remove the nut, there are two flat washers behind it. Remove them also and keep in order. The middle one has a clearly marked outside. The user manual says to discrard the nut and replace with a new one. In my research I had read that it is often reused so use your best judgement here.



This next step is the potential for a huge mistake. When you remove the OEM clutch drum, the flatwasher will most likely be stuck to the rear of it as you can see in the next picture. As you are going to install the slipper in place of this drum, you could miss putting this washer back in if you didn't notice it.



This is what you are looking at now with everything out of the way.



My stock clutch was still in good shape so I zip tied it all together in order to keep.



This is the new stuff that is going back in now. I forgot to lay out the spring hubs and bolts.

 

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These are all the old parts you are going to reuse minus the washer that was stuck to the inside of the clutch cover for the idler gear shaft. I still had that in the clutch cover. If there is something in this picture you don't have, find it!



Time to start putting it all back together. Remember that big washer that was stuck to the rear of the clutch hub? Put that on first.



Next we install the one piece Yoyodyne clutch hub.



Next comes the first flat washer



Then the other washer that is clearly marked as having and OUT

 

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Next we reinstall the main nut with locktite using the clutch holder and torquing it to spec per the manual.





Next reinstall the cap over the clutch rod and make sure you use a punch to recess and lock on the nut.



Now we install the clutch plates and steel spacers. This installation is per Yoyodyne and you can see more details about slipper clutches at this link they provided if you like:

http://www.yoyodyneti.com/motorcycle_slipper_clutch_operat.htm

Per Yoyodyne instructions, if you look at the picture of the OEM order, we are going to switch the first clutch plate and Judder springs with the second clutch plate. Go read the link for an explanation as to why. Some people I talked to said they did not do this but suggested I follow Yoyodynes instructions.

In the picture starting at the bottom you will see the narrow clutch plate (6), the unique steel plate (22) and the second clutch plate (7).



Grab the second clutch plate (7) and slide it in first. You will notice two types of alternating channels inside the clutch hub. One continuous in size and one recessed that has a lip inside with a smaller channel. Rotate the clutch disk until the ears slide down the channel that is continuous in width.



Next install the one unique steel plate (22).

 

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Now we install the first oem clutch disk (6) and slide the judder springs inside that disk as you can see in the photo. Make sure the Judder springs are installed in the right order and orientation.



Now continue installing the remainder of the clutch plates and steel plates in OEM order according to the manual with the ears sliding into the same channel as the first disk you installed and then offsetting the last clutch plate so the ears are in the channel that has the lip inside.
NOTE: I forgot to rotate the last plate and went back in after the fact to correct this so this picture is correct. The following pictures are from the original install and show the last clutch plate not rotated so don't let those confuse you.



Next we slide on the new Yoyodyne pressure plate



Next I install a couple of springs and check the height of the new clutch pack to make sure it is within specs. Read the link above that goes to Yoyodynes site about this step. It is important. Mine came out good.



Install the springs (I used new ones) using the included Yoyodyne caps and screws and torque 8 to 10 ft/lbs per Yoyodyne.

 

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Next we install the washer that was stuck to the inside of the clutch cover. There is already a spring washer that was left on.



Choice is yours here if you want to use Honda Bond but I chose to buy the gasket. Carefully clean up the old honda bond off the block being careful not to get it in the crank case and the inside of the cover. Next install the gasket over the dowel pins.



Now this part is worth the price of admission alone. You can try to get the cover on and an hour later kick your bike over, or you can do it the easy way which I was told how to do it. Remove the timing cover from the clutch plate and start aligning the cover over the two shafts that need to slide into the cover. While holding pressure against the cover, use a rachet and socket on the nut under the timing cover to slowly turn clockwise to turn the engine over. Keep doing this slowly and the two rods will come into alignment and the plate will slide right on.





Reinstall the timing cover and all the bolts and reconnect the wire running it behind the frame. I could not find any torque values for the cover bolts. It just said to tighten them in a cross pattern going around two or three times. That's it!



I took to for a test ride and it went in gear and shifted very well, I won't be able to test the slipper feature until I take it to the track but I did do a couple of quick downshifts and it appeared to be working correct. It is hard to get it in neutral while stopped without rocking it, but I hope that will ease with use.

If you have any questions, I'll be glad to try and help. Due the size of this post, please don't use "quote" as it will just add to the loading time. If you have any questions on any individual pictures, just include the link in your reply. I hope this helps someone that might want to do this job themselves. If I'm informed of any mistakes, I will be making edits and noting the change.
 

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FANTASTIC write up buddy. Threads like this really gives hope to 1000rr.net. Enjoy trail braking and fearless cornering brother!!!
 

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Thanks Guys. I sat on my ass for months scared to try this as I had never been in the engine before. I've done just about everything around the engine but never inside. After searching and not finding much to go on, I decided to give it a shot and while I was at it maybe make it easier for the next guy. I did make a couple of calls to a friend that got me through a couple of head scratchers. Overall, it was not bad.
 

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Nice write up. Might even motivate me to swap the STM for the Yoyodyne I have on the shelf... never did get a chance to compare the two.... Think it's time fore a new lock-nut though.

Sticky it!
 

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Nice write up, was thinking about doing this mod to my bike....might become one of my winter projects since I'll have the downtime.
 

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really good writeup, i am hoping to get a yoyodyne this winter from for my wife' 600rr. Lucky for me there is a few install vids for her bike :thumbsup:
 

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Not sure as the 08 has a slipper but not sure it is a true slipper like the Yoyodyne. I have never tracked my 08 so I have never had the opportunity to do any aggressive downshifts. Hopefully someone else can answer this question.
 

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Awesome write up man, thanks for taking out the time to do this.
 
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