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Little Big Guy
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263 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
can someone explain to me what the rubber o-rings do on a chain? and what would happen if they wasnt there? just trying to get to know more about my bike. can anyone help? thanks,
 

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Banned
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50,059 Posts
Instead of metal on metal you have Metal - O-ring - Metal.

Makes the chain last a lot longer. The rubber also holds lubrication better.
 

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Little Big Guy
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263 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
so if one or more was damaged or missing or whatever, it still would be safe, but just wont last as long?
 

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The Awesome
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225 Posts
so if one or more was damaged or missing or whatever, it still would be safe, but just wont last as long?
I wouldn't suggest that. Metal on metal at the speed the chain moves is probably not a good practice, even if well-lubed. imho
 

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Premium Member
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1,356 Posts
I wouldn't suggest that. Metal on metal at the speed the chain moves is probably not a good practice, even if well-lubed. imho
+1. The chain will wear very quickly and break.
 

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Banned
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Street only I would run it. If you are going to hit the track... I could go either way. If money is tight, fuck it. I would run it. But be sure to be checking it before every session. Same with the street. Check it often. But like I said if you got the cash then buy yourself some piece of mind.

If rings are missing that means it was allowed to get really dry and the rubber dried out. Proper lubrication is the key here. A must before storage. There's also a slight chance of small rocks/dirt getting in there and cutting the ring.
 

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Bleed Red, Ride Red
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1,097 Posts
Instead of metal on metal you have Metal - O-ring - Metal.

Makes the chain last a lot longer. The rubber also holds lubrication better.
+1 on what Strand said and also the o-ring is used to keep dirt and debris
from entering the pivot points on the chain where it could bind and further accelerate the wear process.
 

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De Utter Duktur
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515 Posts
Like the others have said - the o-rings are there to keep lube in and all the crap out.

If an o-ring is damaged it lets lube escape (and letting dust/dirt/water in) your chain will have no lubrication for that pin, so it's metal on metal. That causes a lot of heat. The metal shavings (more like a fine dust) work their way to the outside of the chain and settle there - you will see the dreaded 'red dust of death'.



The pin still in the sideplate was one that had a bad o-ring - see the wear pattern? The 2 on the right had good o-rings and lube.



Not that I would ever let this happen to a chain on one of my bikes....cough.
 
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