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Discussion Starter #1
what is the best way to test the rebound; at home and with only one person.

And how to fine tune it on the road (not track!)
 

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Why do you need to adjust it for street? What the issue you are Experiencing?

You can always do a click at a time and test.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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NO way to set and verify rebound settings other than ride the bike, trial and error adjustments, and reading tire wear. No such thing as a magic number as no bike, rider, riding skill and style, road conditions, tire pressures, type of tire, temperature etc is the same

best way to "TEST" rebound is hold the bike level off the kickstand and push the front and rear suspension down at the same time and see if it comes up to a resting position at the same rate. If the front suspension bounces (starts a second or third stroke) rebound is too soft (Fast). Add rebound til the forks come up and stop without starting a second stroke.
This will get you in the ballpark for a starting point.
Tire wear (reading tire sipe edge wear) will tell you if you are to soft or to hard

There are a ton of info on this site and many others to walk you through the full suspension set-up as both static and rider sag should be verified and set up first.
 

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One of the easiest to understand and most practical guide for the 'average' guy (which is why I have it) is this:

 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys

This is the article which prompted my question nigel. The bit which says about taking about a second for the rebound.

I recently changed to a harder casing tyre with less flex. I had the suspension set with the softer casing tyre a couple of years back; so now I assume there is more compression in the spring/ shock combination which is fine by me but I was wondering if I should alter the rebound to allow for the additional suspension travel.

FYI our roads here are terrible, full of potholes and a lot of deep surface delamination.

2015HRC: how would you read the tyre groov edge wear?
 

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My view is that if you're not able to tell the ride difference between a soft and hard casing, there'd be no need to change suspension settings.

However, if you can tell the difference, the adjustments would be so minute that I believe they could be only determined by a professional setting the bike up with you on it. As an analogy, this would probably be no different than a rider putting on a couple of kilograms over a month or so. The difference in ridability would be so negligible - unless you're a track rider able to zero in on such minutae. All the best, whichever way you go!!:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Unfortunately for me, my brain & body seem to be hyper sensitive to motorvehicle performance aspects:(. It would have been easier on my pocket if they weren't

In this instance, the difference in bump absorption was night & day (michelin pilot power > pilot power 3). Initially I felt the change was a bad & expensive mistake but once the dust had settled, I felt the back end absorbs the bumps in a more controlled way and less bouncy, so in the end I am happy with the change.
I won't bore you about other handling aspects I noticed :sleep::sleep:
I might end up contacting the specialist who set the bike up once people are back at work
 

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Wow! I must be a friggin' useless rider and rank minus 50 on the sensitivity scale, OR have hyper-compensatory skills.:)

Between 10 bikes, none of which are set up professionally and have remained as purchased, I can barely tell the difference. All credit to you for that ability. (y)
 

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I can tell the difference in my suspension between ambient temperature changes and actually change my settings based on it. 50 degrees outside and the viscosity of oil is must different (thicker which means slower compression and rebound) than 90 degrees.
As far as reading tire wear, Dave moss and many others have numerous videos on the subject but here it is in a nutshell:
Run your hand over the tire and see if the tire feels 'lumpy' or are the front/back edges of the tire sipes wearing at different rates. You can only adjust suspension settings for the area of the tire you are on the throttle so don't worry about the edges of the tire.
 

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If your tire flex is being used as part of the suspension then your suspension settings are not right.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Wow! I must be a friggin' useless rider and rank minus 50 on the sensitivity scale, OR have hyper-compensatory skills.:)

Between 10 bikes, none of which are set up professionally and have remained as purchased, I can barely tell the difference. All credit to you for that ability. (y)
Some say it’s a curse And I should take something to blunt my sensors!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Thanks HRC that picture and the not explains it all. (y)I cannot see that kind of wear at all so maybe I can leave things as they are. however there’s a minute wear difference between the leading and trailing edges of the sips. I can take a pic next time I am near the bike
the tyre flex I was referring to was the dynamics of the suspension where flexing becomes part of it.
mine was originally set by the tuner to cope with our degrading roads.
 

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as long as the bike feels "planted" or not losing traction or the tires aren't skipping off bumps and your tire wear looks good then you should be in the ballpark. Remember you are riding a super sport bike not a touring or cruiser so our bikes were never designed to feel like sitting on the couch. They are made for all out performance so there is going to be some sort of compromise.
With track bikes there are many other factors that can lead you to making changes such as pushing wide in corners, coming out of corners, or not wanting to turn in and so forth. These telltale markers for track bikes really don't come into play on a street bike because you aren't riding the bike on the edge of performance (at least not for those of us that have safety and some common sense come into play). Also realize these settings are much more critical on the track as you are constantly pushing the bike and your ability to the limits.

If your sag (both static and rider) are within a reasonable range (especially static sag in the rear), you are using the majority of available suspension travel (ziptie on fork tube) and have 10-20mm left for emergency bottom out, your tire pressures are correct (psi increase from measured cold to measured hot after riding), and your tire wear looks good you should be about as good as you are gonna get with your current suspension.
If you do make a change to any suspension setting the main thing is to record what the settings are now so you can always go back. Then make one change at a time.
If you want a "smoother" more plush ride try a 1/2 turn towards soft on the compression setting. Ride it on a road you know well (I'm in Michigan so I have plenty of destroyed roads close by the house) and see how if feels. If its better try another 1/2 turn soft and ride. If it feels worse go back towards hard.
It is truly a trial and error process especially once you have a good base setting (sounds like you do from tire wear and having a "pro" set it up initially). I change my settings (mostly rebound but also compression) several times a year on the street due to riding conditions and ambient temperatures.The changes aren't drastic but allow me to keep the bike consistent so I know how it is going to respond to specific situations and that response is consistent
 

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From the limited info you gave on the cause for your concern with suspension settings and mainly being due to a tire type/manufacturer change I would suggest focusing on tire pressures.

Check the tire pressure cold (before riding) and record both front and rear psi numbers. Go ride the bike as you normally do for a while (30min-40min) and immediately check tire pressures again. Record numbers.
The psi change should be within 4-6 psi (I believe, might have to look this up). If the difference is less than this range you need to drop your tire pressure, if its above this range you need to add some pressure. I make psi changes of a few pounds, 2-3 psi at a time. As you get closer your psi changes will be less.

What you are doing is setting the size of your contact patch. More air in the tire = less contact patch, less air = bigger/wider/more contact patch. The smaller the contact patch the less heat you will put in the tires, the bigger patch the more heat. This is critical for both acceleration and braking traction as well as tire wear and longevity

Note that you will need to start with a cold reading on your next ride and follow the above procedure. May take several days/rides to get it dialed in correctly but I do this almost every ride so it just becomes a habit as ambient temperatures and riding style will play a factor and only takes a few minutes.

If after your first ride and tire pressure check you find you need to add/subtract tire pressure you can still do so immediately with a warm tire and go ride to see the feel difference but the cold-warm tire pressure difference should not be recorded and used as a measurement for change because the "cold" tire pressure is now actually warm tire pressure as it takes a while for the tires to cool down after riding.
Hope that makes sense
 

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Unfortunately for me, my brain & body seem to be hyper sensitive to motorvehicle performance aspects:(. It would have been easier on my pocket if they weren't

In this instance, the difference in bump absorption was night & day (michelin pilot power > pilot power 3). Initially I felt the change was a bad & expensive mistake but once the dust had settled, I felt the back end absorbs the bumps in a more controlled way and less bouncy, so in the end I am happy with the change.
I won't bore you about other handling aspects I noticed :sleep::sleep:
I might end up contacting the specialist who set the bike up once people are back at work
The stocker S21 were simply unforgettably awful, to the point the whole bike felt like a huge sping, and I was chasing ghosts with the suspension settings. Jesus Christ, what a revelation and huge diference the Q4 are.
 

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From the limited info you gave on the cause for your concern with suspension settings and mainly being due to a tire type/manufacturer change I would suggest focusing on tire pressures.

Check the tire pressure cold (before riding) and record both front and rear psi numbers. Go ride the bike as you normally do for a while (30min-40min) and immediately check tire pressures again. Record numbers.
The psi change should be within 4-6 psi (I believe, might have to look this up). If the difference is less than this range you need to drop your tire pressure, if its above this range you need to add some pressure. I make psi changes of a few pounds, 2-3 psi at a time. As you get closer your psi changes will be less.

What you are doing is setting the size of your contact patch. More air in the tire = less contact patch, less air = bigger/wider/more contact patch. The smaller the contact patch the less heat you will put in the tires, the bigger patch the more heat. This is critical for both acceleration and braking traction as well as tire wear and longevity

Note that you will need to start with a cold reading on your next ride and follow the above procedure. May take several days/rides to get it dialed in correctly but I do this almost every ride so it just becomes a habit as ambient temperatures and riding style will play a factor and only takes a few minutes.

If after your first ride and tire pressure check you find you need to add/subtract tire pressure you can still do so immediately with a warm tire and go ride to see the feel difference but the cold-warm tire pressure difference should not be recorded and used as a measurement for change because the "cold" tire pressure is now actually warm tire pressure as it takes a while for the tires to cool down after riding.
Hope that makes sense

Yes, in a controlled environment. If you go for a ride, even 40 min and you don't push hard, have some lean, get on it, don't be surprised you will not see 4 PSI raise, especially with street tires.
Don't overthink it. No need for more than 33/34PSI rear, 32/33 front for street riding. OK, IF you are on the heavy scale, 250+ up it a little on the rear.
 

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Yes, in a controlled environment. If you go for a ride, even 40 min and you don't push hard, have some lean, get on it, don't be surprised you will not see 4 PSI raise, especially with street tires.
Don't overthink it. No need for more than 33/34PSI rear, 32/33 front for street riding. OK, IF you are on the heavy scale, 250+ up it a little on the rear.
I've never had an issue getting heat in my tires on the street even when it's below 50 degrees out. I run 32psi front and 28 rear most of the time. Excellent traction, good tire wear.
Regardless of how you determine your tire pressures I would suggest some sort of process to figure it out not just guess or go by what some fucktard said was best. I've seen guys on here claiming to get 15-20k miles out of a set of tires running the owners manual psi settings while still never losing traction, dragging knee and busting 180mph highway runs. Think I'll stick with a proven method!
But you are correct not to overthink it and yes if you are just putting along to work or to the store than you most likely will never put much heat in your tires. The ranges you suggest are a good safe starting point.If what you have works for you why change it. If and most likely when you have an issue with tire wear, traction, ride performance etc then it's time to look at making a change which of course was the point of this post to begin with.
Id say check your cold/warm tire pressures and see what you get. Cant hurt and gives you a better idea of how tire pressures effect wear/feel etc. might find out you are dead on now and need to make no changes.
 
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