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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have an 07 1000RR, the last generation made without a slipper clutch. Does anybody else notice that unless your revmatches are 100% accurate, it is kind of jerky? I rode my boys SC59 and revmatching with the slipper clutch was sooooo much smoother. Im not talking about being completely off the mark either, I’m never any more than 100rpm off target. So my question is, does anybody have any tricks for making downshifts smoother? Is it better to over or under rev while matching? I get my blips pretty damn close, but I’m a human, not a robot. I’m also wondering if I’m doing any damage if my rev match is 50-100 RPM over or under my target. Common sense tells me no, but like I said, anything other than a perfect revmatch, and you can definitely feel the jerk. Should I just stop thinking about it so much and just ride the damn thing lol?
 

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Here is the secret.

If rev matching with intent to ACCELERATE you must rev it higher than wheel speed at time clutch is dropped.

If rev matching with intent to DECELERATE you must rev it slower than wheel speed at the clutch is dropped.

A lot of jerkiness is from people doing the opposite.

Both non-slipper and slipper clutches have springs to absorb sudden forces. Also have rear sprocket holder rubber inserts to cushion the drive. No risk of damage.
 

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Sounds like your timing is off. I never noticed jerkiness with my 03 600RR.

If it's too jerky you can try releasing the clutch a little more gently. And no you are not doing any damage. These bikes/clutches can take a lot.

I would just ride the damn thing, and practice. Are you sure you are totally OFF the throttle when you release the clutch? If not that will definitely cause a big jerk. Otherwise 50-100rpm should not cause any real jerkiness in my experience.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sounds like your timing is off. I never noticed jerkiness with my 03 600RR.

If it's too jerky you can try releasing the clutch a little more gently. And no you are not doing any damage. These bikes/clutches can take a lot.

I would just ride the damn thing, and practice. Are you sure you are totally OFF the throttle when you release the clutch? If not that will definitely cause a big jerk. Otherwise 50-100rpm should not cause any real jerkiness in my experience.
Yeah. It doesn’t absolutely upset the suspension and jerk the bike visibly, it’s just something I can feel since I’m very in tune with my engines speed. I don’t think its a timing thing, I’ve been operating manual transmissions for 20+ years. I think I just pay too much attention to every little aspect of the engine instead of paying attention to riding.

Here is the secret.

If rev matching with intent to ACCELERATE you must rev it higher than wheel speed at time clutch is dropped.

If rev matching with intent to DECELERATE you must rev it slower than wheel speed at the clutch is dropped.

A lot of jerkiness is from people doing the opposite.

Both non-slipper and slipper clutches have springs to absorb sudden forces. Also have rear sprocket holder rubber inserts to cushion the drive. No risk of damage.
I will definitely give it a try. I noticed that when I downshift with the intention of decelerating blipping slightly less is smoother bc the wheel speed is being decreased by the brake. I will give slightly more revs and see how that feels.
I don’t want this post to come across as me trying to learn how to rev match. I learned how to do it decades ago. It’s more a case of me wanting to get it as close to perfect as possible as often as possible. I hear all those new bikes with autoblip and love how every shift sounds so precise and surgical. However, I realize it’s not very realistic to want to be as precise as a computer…
 

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I disagree with the advice to release the clutch slower. While it works, it also consumes unnecessary attention away from other tasks. I find that if decelerating and allowing RPM to decay too far, it becomes more challenging to get the match right. Otherwise, remember the sound range of where the downshift is appropriate and just get it done.

I’ve been sport riding for 19 years and remember fondly when I decided to try downshifting and blipping. I practiced it off the bike to get the control motions down and then it didn’t take long to do it on the bike. It’s nearly effortless for me to ride another bike and do the same thing, but I agree the SC57 is probably the most demanding for proper technique.
 

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I disagree with the advice to release the clutch slower. While it works, it also consumes unnecessary attention away from other tasks. I find that if decelerating and allowing RPM to decay too far, it becomes more challenging to get the match right. Otherwise, remember the sound range of where the downshift is appropriate and just get it done.

I’ve been sport riding for 19 years and remember fondly when I decided to try downshifting and blipping. I practiced it off the bike to get the control motions down and then it didn’t take long to do it on the bike. It’s nearly effortless for me to ride another bike and do the same thing, but I agree the SC57 is probably the most demanding for proper technique.
Absolutely! Forgot to mention in my last post, if the rev's are matched then it does not matter how fast the clutch is released. On our bikes the rev's drop so quickly you do not have time to feather the clutch from downshifts. Start to dump clutch as soon as throttle begins to close from the blip.

SC57 deceleration fuel cut is the reason the rev's drop so quickly. If it's disabled via ECU flash the rev's hang a little longer and clutch can be released slower. But with deceleration fuel cut the motor is has substantial engine braking with roll-off and crank speed drops very quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Idk if anybody on this thread has owned both a SC57 and SC59, but I figured I’d ask here before creating a new thread. I rode my boys 09 1000RR and it was magnificent. The handling and suspension being the biggest difference, it just feels very confidence inspiring to ride while my 07 feels like you have to put a lot more effort into turning in and quick direction changes. With this years tax return, I could go and buy an 08-12 and take my time selling my 07, or I could keep my 07 for longer and save up for a 14+ 1000RR SP. You guys have any opinion on what you think I should do? I love riding in the canyons which is why the SC59 feels so amazing to me. I came from a R6 and the SC59 is almost as nimble as my old R6. Anybody with an SC57 knows it’s not very confidence inspiring in tight, technical corners. At the same time I want to stay with a 1000 just because of how stable they feel at top speed. Any opinions are welcome, I’m honestly just brainstorming.
 

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I don't know what year you have but there were geometry changes in the 06/07 opposed to 04/05. I did GP Suspension's revalve kit up front (and springs) and Penske rear shock. I didn't feel the bike was holding me back at NJMP Thunderbolt, though I was a bit quicker on the 2021 BMW S1000RR about a month prior.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't know what year you have but there were geometry changes in the 06/07 opposed to 04/05. I did GP Suspension's revalve kit up front (and springs) and Penske rear shock. I didn't feel the bike was holding me back at NJMP Thunderbolt, though I was a bit quicker on the 2021 BMW S1000RR about a month prior.
I have a 07 CBR1000RR. It’s nice, but when I rode my friends 09, it’s impossible to not admit that the geometry is worlds better on the 08-12, combine that with the slipper clutch and better aerodynamics, it makes for an all around amazing superbike that inspires loads of confidence. I mean, there is a reason that generation won 2008-2009 international superbike of the year!
 

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it’s impossible to not admit that the geometry is worlds better on the 08-12, combine that with the slipper clutch and better aerodynamics, it makes for an all around amazing superbike that inspires loads of confidence.
But the 04-07 generation looks so much better, by far, no contest.
:)

07 owner
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I honestly felt the aesthetics of the 04-07 were better then the 08-13 when I was looking for my CBR, but I’ve grown to like looks of the the SC59 in darker colors. The tail is the biggest improvement in my eyes. Slim, clean, neat and tidy; not cumbersome, chunky, and messy like ours looks with the exhaust jutting out of its butt and the exposed heat shield you can see through the gaps. But honestly, if you rode one, you wouldn’t care how it looked. The geometry of that bike makes it feel 100 years newer than our generation. I had an 09 R6 before moving to this CBR and I can seriously compare the handling of my friends ‘09 to that R6. The SC59 inspired so much confidence it was unbelievable. I don’t know how else to describe it. If your not into tight technical twisties then our generation is bitchin, but if you want amazing handling in the twisties without sacrificing any speed or acceleration, the SC59 fits the ticket better than any bike I’ve ever ridden. It’s won many awards for that exact reason, and thats probably the reason Honda hasn’t made any major revisions to the frames geometry since 2008. If you get the chance to ride one, I HIGHLY recommend it. You’ll love it.
 
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