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That depends on where I put the remote adjuster. With the collar 6.5mm from the top of the shock right now it takes 16 turns of the remote adjuster to get 30mm sag.
Ok then here is what the next important piece of information is. With the preload adjuster is all the way backed off. What is the length of the installed spring?

This will not be an easy thing to measure as it is all, but impossible to measure it accurately to the millimeter when the spring is hidden inside the swingarm, but this is exactly the kind of info we use to determine proper set-up.

It sounds like you need more spring with less preload, but again the numbers tell the real story nd if you have altered the initial collar preload from stock too far then that can also cause you a bit of grief.
 

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I’m a firm believer in riding a bike as is quite a few times before “fixing” it. Every bike feels fucked up after you’ve been riding other bikes then buy a new one. All the worse if you’ve been away from riding for a while.
Could not agree more with this! Manufacturers don't make bikes that handle poorly. People mess with them by changing gearing, tires and start cranking the rebound and compression in because they think they know better or want more acceleration or want better tires. A lot of what I do when setting bikes up for riders is getting the bike back to stock and then adjusting for the changes they made....
 

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Not trying to correct you but I had read the CBR ABS system did weigh 18 lbs. I don't recall which magazine but I do recall that and thinking no thanks :)
I realize now thats a dumb question cause after I remove ABS it just weighs as much as normal bike :LOL:
 

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I took some pictures to show what I see.

i measured from triple clamp to the top of the flat part of the gold area. it varies around 4.0 to 4.5mm, depending on where measured around the cap.

View attachment 261550

View attachment 261551
Thanks for the info, typically when measuring ride height one considers only the fork tube, not the fork cap. Do you recall if this is stock or has the fork ride height been altered?
 

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Not trying to correct you but I had read the CBR ABS system did weigh 18 lbs. I don't recall which magazine but I do recall that and thinking no thanks :)
Meh... if I am wrong I am wrong and there is no harm in pointing that out as I am not perfect nor have I removed an ABS system from a 1000RR, but I have removed them from numerous ZX-10's and R6's, S1000RR etc and all the components combined barely weigh a few lbs at best
 

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I realize now thats a dumb question cause after I remove ABS it just weighs as much as normal bike :LOL:
I don't think it is a dumb question per se. Each spring rate, think 100 N/m vs 95 N/m, is good for about 20 lbs difference in rider weight.

The ABS and exhaust are sprung weight so if you remove them and drop 35 lbs from a stock bike and your total rider weight (with gear) remains the same as does your pace, think track lap time and rider input, then the springs could be too stiff after removal of these parts.

Meh... if I am wrong I am wrong and there is no harm in pointing that out as I am not perfect nor have I removed an ABS system from a 1000RR, but I have removed them from numerous ZX-10's and R6's, S1000RR etc and all the components combined barely weigh a few lbs at best
Yea and I agree with you 100% on those other bikes.....apparently Honda went their own way initially and their ABS system was HEAVY! Not sure if the bike we are talking about has that specific ABS system but yea it was not a good choice on the part of Honda.

It is worse than I thought, yikes! This could be incorrect but I just did a quick search and found this for a 2013 CBR1000RR --> 2013 Honda CBR 1000 RR (C-ABS) | Preview
  • Curb Weight: 439 pounds (CBR1000RR) / 465 pounds (CBR100RR C-ABS)
26 lbs difference, ugh.
 

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The realist in me says that serves people right for buying an ABS bike to begin with :ROFLMAO:
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Thanks for the info, typically when measuring ride height one considers only the fork tube, not the fork cap. Do you recall if this is stock or has the fork ride height been altered?
I know, you actually asked for the measurement without the cap and I got a bit lazy..
anyways, i went to do more measurements and found a few things, that might be troubling.

first, the left fork, gives different measurements. on the outside, compared to the inside. zooming in, seems like the outer side of the fork is about 1 grove higher. At first, I attributed this to top of the clamp not being perfectly flat.
here's a picture
261552


I then measured the right fork.
It measures about 1mm higher than the left one
so, the fork (silver part) is about about 1.7mm on the left, and at about 2.6 on the right.

I also looked at the manual. the instructions say the following:
261553


So, it appears that my front forks are both higher than recommended and not 100% even.
 

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@Bosston ok so let's put those both back to just the top cap above. Make sure you properly torque both upper and lower clamps. A good way to be sure the forks are even is to be able to slide freely the axle between the two fork legs.
 

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Discussion Starter #32
@Bosston ok so let's put those both back to just the top cap above. Make sure you properly torque both upper and lower clamps. A good way to be sure the forks are even is to be able to slide freely the axle between the two fork legs.
Is this as easy as:
  • lifting the bike with the triple clamp
  • leaving the front wheel in there, as in, not removing the wheel.
  • loosening all the upper/lower clamp bolts
  • adjusting the position and then tightening?
 

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Dave Moss has a video where he shows how to adjust the height one side at a time by tilting the bike on the kickstand but it seems a little hazardous.
 

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^
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^
So he doesn't have the correct tools to make the adjustments and actually has a video out there showing how to do it sketchy.

Very Professional :ROFLMAO:
 

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^
^
^
So he doesn't have the correct tools to make the adjustments and actually has a video out there showing how to do it sketchy.

Very Professional :ROFLMAO:
I will say that I love Ohlins for how much attention to detail they put into designing their fork cap to be the easiest to remove of any fork I've tried. Yet Dave Moss has a "premium" paid video showing people to LIFT THE ENTIRE FORK CAP by brute force to fit a wrench on top of the collar that's so cleverly designed to accept a wrench without lifting the cap.

All you have to do is use the thin 17 or 19mm wrench that Ohlins tells you to and it takes no effort. It's obvious he's not an Ohlins certified repair guy but still could read the service manual and do it right with the right tool.
 
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