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The problem is that when tire pressure recommendations are explained in plain terms, it goes right over some people's heads and the some people won't be swayed from their original ignorant question... All done with this thread now.
And that's fine, at the end of the day it all comes down to individuals riding styles and what you want out of your bike and riding experience.
For many years and numerous bikes I never touched suspension settings or varied tire pressure. I adapted to the bike. Once I decided to actually learn and understand the variables involved and how to make the bike better for me I now realize how my lack of knowledge, willingness to learn, and trial and error has hampered my improvement in skill level and overall experience on a sport bike.
There is a saying, I believe from one of the suspension "gurus" or rider class instructors that goes something like this: the best you have ever rode is the best you know. That's not the exact saying but you get the point. The saying went over my head until I started understanding settings and changing them to work for me. It makes complete sense now.
 

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Remember folks we're talking about Tire Pressure for the Street. Pretty sure anyone asking for recommendations is not aggressively late trail braking nor aggressively accelerating at maximum lean angles. If you want the best compromise between handling and tire life on the street, then follow the manufacturer's recommendation.
 

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Remember folks we're talking about Tire Pressure for the Street. Pretty sure anyone asking for recommendations is not aggressively late trail braking nor aggressively accelerating at maximum lean angles. If you want the best compromise between handling and tire life on the street, then follow the manufacturer's recommendation.
Sorry but this is just not true.
 

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Regardless or whether daily commuting or track riding tires are there for traction and grip to the road. This is a vital for safety.

Forget about high speed cornering or dragging knee but imagine panic braking on a less than optimal set up tire for grip! Hitting a spot of gravel, water, oil, or tar snakes.
In order for a tire to perform at an optimal designed level they need heat and the correct amount.
This is what you are optimizing when you change tire pressures, that and contact patch size (which is what determines how much heat is put into the tires), feedback, and feel.

Pro teams and track day enthusiasts will use the ideal method of measuring tire temp with an IR temperature gun. They strive to achieve the exact tire temp the tire manufacturer designates as optimal operating temp
A less accurate but widely recognized as an acceptable method of determining the amount of heat put into a tire is by comparing cold to hot tire pressures.

Those running 36f/42r I would ask you to check your cold tire pressure and immediately after a ride again check (hot) tire pressure. I would bet you are only getting a few psi increase hot compared to cold. 4-5 psi is optimal for tire performance (as a general rule of thumb for most sport bike tires)
If you are getting less than 4-5 psi increase than you have too small a contact patch and need to reduce tire pressure. More than 5 psi and you have too large a contact patch and need to increase tire pressure.

Another less accurate but considered acceptable method for the street is the 10/20 method. You want to see a 10% increase in psi on the front and a 20% increase on the rear.
This method is considered the best compromise in tire performance vs wear and safety on a street bike as it takes into account riding style, type of bike, rider skill level and weight, ambient temp, road temp, speed, etc.

This information and methods are not my opinion, a theory, or some shit I made up. It's the way every tire manufacturer, pro race team, or anyone who is knowledgeable in tire pressures and performance set tire pressure. Of course there are slight variances to setting tire pressure based on individual use, needs, and skill levels but this is the industry standard.
 

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Just to add that higher tire pressure actually reduces hydroplaning.
 

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Just to add that higher tire pressure actually reduces hydroplaning.
That makes sense on a car with a much larger contact patch per tire, much wider tires, tires being flat vs rounded, and 4 tires making contact at the same time.
Not sure it applies to a sport bike tire.
Ever notice the tread on your front tire is opposite or "backwards" compared to the rear tire?
This is for traction while braking since the front tire does almost all the braking on a sport bike
Can't be good for water distribution and removal in a wet enough situation to hydroplane can it?
 

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About hydroplaning it is pretty intuitive that a smaller contact patch is less likely to ride on top of the water.

I don't ride my cbr in the rain though, and if I did, I would adjust my tire pressures accordingly for that ride and then put them back to where they should be for a warm dry day 😉
 

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About hydroplaning it is pretty intuitive that a smaller contact patch is less likely to ride on top of the water.

I don't ride my cbr in the rain though, and if I did, I would adjust my tire pressures accordingly for that ride and then put them back to where they should be for a warm dry day 😉
Hydroplaning is an effect of the tire tread not being able to move water out from under the tire fast enough which allows a layer of water between the entire tire contact patch and the driving surface. The wider the tires the more likely they will hydroplane due to more water to move out of the contact patch area.
Street bike tires really don't come into play in this scenario, at least to no where near the extent of a car tire. Speed also plays a huge factor in a hydroplaning scenario and although most of us may drive too fast in the rain while behind the wheel of a car most will not on a sport bike
 

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Sorry but this is just not true.
Well I'm just a noob that's been riding for decades all year around in anything from triple digit temps to just below freezing. Weird that I can get my knee down on the streets using manufacturer's recommended pressures when others say no way. "You can't enter a 40 mph turn at 80mph in the winter." Really? Come follow me.
 

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I don't know who's dumber. Honda, or the folks that buy their products? :ROFLMAO:
 

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Hydroplaning is an effect of the tire tread not being able to move water out from under the tire fast enough which allows a layer of water between the entire tire contact patch and the driving surface. The wider the tires the more likely they will hydroplane due to more water to move out of the contact patch area.
Street bike tires really don't come into play in this scenario, at least to no where near the extent of a car tire. Speed also plays a huge factor in a hydroplaning scenario and although most of us may drive too fast in the rain while behind the wheel of a car most will not on a sport bike
Welp, the freaking OEM rear tire that came on the 2017 SP sucked ass in the rain when BRAND NEW. Ask me how I know.
 

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Well I'm just a noob that's been riding for decades all year around in anything from triple digit temps to just below freezing. Weird that I can get my knee down on the streets using manufacturer's recommended pressures when others say no way. "You can't enter a 40 mph turn at 80mph in the winter." Really? Come follow me.
I don't think anyone was questioning your skill or experience but rather the statement in general.

Once again the Honda recommended tire pressure setting is a one size fits all RECOMMENDATION to cover all possible scenarios and uses for the bike to cover their ass and the tire manufacturer from liability . They would rather a single 140lbs rider have overinflated tires than a 250lbs rider with a 180lbs passenger with saddle bags and a tank bag on the road with under inflated tires.
Funny how personal guys take certain personal preferences when it comes to sport bikes.
Oil, chain lube, air filters, tires, and tire pressures discussions all cause many to take others opposing opinions as a personal attack and a declaration of war.
 

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Welp, the freaking OEM rear tire that came on the 2017 SP sucked ass in the rain when BRAND NEW. Ask me how I know.
Yeah some do. The OEM tires on my 2015 were sketchy AF when it got anywhere under 50 degrees out. It was like riding on iceskates. Rain I never even attempted or got caught in luckily with those tires.

Been in a white out downpour on the expressway at over 80mph on the current Pirelli D.R. III's with some flooding water belly pan deep with no hydroplaning or even a bit of instability noticed.
 

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Once again the Honda recommended tire pressure setting is a one size fits all RECOMMENDATION to cover all possible scenarios and uses for the bike to cover their ass and the tire manufacturer from liability
So how are they covering their ass by recommending the user inflate the rear tire to the maximum pressure but not the front tire to the maximum pressure? I'd like to see a statement from any tire manufacturer that informs users not to follow the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations. Must be a conspiracy between all tire manufacturers and vehicle manufacturers to sell more tires. I wonder who gets the longest tire life, folks that follow manufacturers's recommendation, or those that think pressures for slicks somehow translate to street tires.
 

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Yeah some do. The OEM tires on my 2015 were sketchy AF when it got anywhere under 50 degrees out. It was like riding on iceskates. Rain I never even attempted or got caught in luckily with those tires.

Been in a white out downpour on the expressway at over 80mph on the current Pirelli D.R. III's with some flooding water belly pan deep with no hydroplaning or even a bit of instability noticed.
I commuted on a all brand new 2009, 2010, and 2012 CBRs and a 2014 CB1000R on OEM tires in near or just below freezing temps at recommended pressure and never had a slip leaned over on elevated ramps giving enough throttle, through the entire turn, to keep slack out of the chain.
 

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So how are they covering their ass by recommending the user inflate the rear tire to the maximum pressure but not the front tire to the maximum pressure? I'd like to see a statement from any tire manufacturer that informs users not to follow the vehicle manufacturer's recommendations. Must be a conspiracy between all tire manufacturers and vehicle manufacturers to sell more tires. I wonder who gets the longest tire life, folks that follow manufacturers's recommendation, or those that think pressures for slicks somehow translate to street tires.
I don't think you are grasping the full scope.
You are leaving out critical data, load capacity. No where, anywhere, on any tire, bike, or anywhere else EVER has there been a tire pressure recommendation by a tire manufacturer or bike manufacturer that does not include the words "maximum" and "load" with a weight specified.
The max pressure per max load limit.
 

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I don't think you are grasping the full scope.
You are leaving out critical data, load capacity. No where, anywhere, on any tire, bike, or anywhere else EVER has there been a tire pressure recommendation by a tire manufacturer or bike manufacturer that does not include the words "maximum" and "load" with a weight specified.
The max pressure per max load limit.
Welp, the label on the swingarm of my SP doesn't say shit about any weight. Would you like me take and post a pic?
 

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I commuted on a all brand new 2009, 2010, and 2012 CBRs and a 2014 CB1000R on OEM tires in near or just below freezing temps at recommended pressure and never had a slip leaned over on elevated ramps giving enough throttle, through the entire turn, to keep slack out of the chain.
You seem to be the "unicorn" of the sportbike world. Freezing temps high speed knee dragging on maximum tire pressure settings uphill into blind turns with the throttle pegged. Bet you get 40k miles out of those same tires.
Amazing stuff bro!
 

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Welp, the label on the swingarm of my SP doesn't say shit about any weight. Would you like me take and post a pic?
Try the service manual OR the side of the tire. Not sure the swing arm sticker is the tire pressure Bible! I'm assuming Honda assumes anyone riding a sport bike would have enough common sense to dig a little deeper into it by reading the owners manual. They do give you one with the bike afterall
 

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Welp, the label on the swingarm of my SP doesn't say shit about any weight. Would you like me take and post a pic?
That’s cause the SP isn’t “supposed to” have any pillion weight so shouldn’t possibly hit max load capacity. The base model sticker is different cause it does have that factor considered since it was designed to carry pillion weight.
 
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