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Try the service manual OR the side of the tire. Not sure the swing arm sticker is the tire pressure Bible! I'm assuming Honda assumes anyone riding a sport bike would have enough common sense to dig a little deeper into it by reading the owners manual. They do give you one with the bike afterall
Jesus Christ, there's a reason why the government requires labels on the swingarm and inside the driver's side door. Just admit you're scared to lean a bike over on tires at recommended pressures at temps below 50 degrees Fahrenheit because you're under the belief that it's dangerous.
 

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That’s cause the SP isn’t “supposed to” have any pillion weight so shouldn’t possibly hit max load capacity. The base model sticker is different cause it does have that factor considered since it was designed to carry pillion weight.
Yup, and the recommended tire pressure for the 2017 SP is 36psi front, 42psi rear.
 

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Jesus Christ, there's a reason why the government requires labels on the swingarm and inside the driver's side door. Just admit you're scared to lean a bike over on tires at recommended pressures at temps below 50 degrees Fahrenheit because you're under the belief that it's dangerous.
I'm scared
 

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Yup, and the recommended tire pressure for the 2017 SP is 36psi front, 42psi rear.
And the “recommended” time to shift from 5th to 6th for the 2017 SP is 37mph, so I’m sure you follow that recommendation to the letter as well, lol
 

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I'm scared
(y) You should give it a shot. I promise if you enter a turn using maintenance throttle and without dragging hard parts you'll come out the other end just fine using recommended cold tire pressure, unless the road is wet, covered in oil, sand or gravel.
 

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And the “recommended” time to shift from 5th to 6th for the 2017 SP is 37mph, so I’m sure you follow that recommendation to the letter as well, lol
I've already destroyed one engine using those recommended shift points. It's best to shift exactly 1 mph over Honda's recommendation.
 

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Yup, and the recommended tire pressure for the 2017 SP is 36psi front, 42psi rear.
Just to make a point here that the "recommended" is not an absolute. check this out from Bridge stone:

TRACK USE ONLY TIRE PRESSURE RECOMMENDATIONS

• Tire pressures should be carefully established, especially when running your motorcycle on the track.
• Always refer to the motorcycle manufacturer’s recommendations for track usage and tire pressures.
• Motorcycle tires intended for track usage (“race tires”) have temperatures and pressures at which they function best, which vary according to the circumstances. For specific Bridgestone tires when used on the track, you may use the information in this chart as a reference.
• Make adjustments to front and/or rear pressures based on the following: - Motorcycle type and setup - Track conditions, including surface condition and ambient temperature - Your riding experience
• Ride more carefully until your tires warm up to operating temperature.
• Tires intended for ordinary street/highway usage (“street tires”) do not perform the same as race tires, and have different operating temperatures. Using street tires on the track may void the tire manufacturer warranty.

S22 Front: 30 PSI
S22 Rear: 26 PSI

The fact that Bridgestone has recommended tire pressures for their own tire makes me lean on the side of people arguing that Honda's sticker on the swing arm/manual just a safe recommendation, NOT idea.
 

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I've already destroyed one engine using those recommended shift points. It's best to shift exactly 1 mph over Honda's recommendation.
Haha, you're just messing with us now right?
I would really like to explore this statement further but it's really for my amusement only and doesn't add to this tire pressure thread in the least bit.
I would ask you start a "Bevo knows best" or "Bevo ruins everything" thread so we can get your insight into everything sportbike, or hell, life related.
 

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You seem to be the "unicorn" of the sportbike world. Freezing temps high speed knee dragging on maximum tire pressure settings uphill into blind turns with the throttle pegged. Bet you get 40k miles out of those same tires.
Amazing stuff bro!
Obviously it's not max pressure because Bridgestone has 42 psi max on the front while Honda recommends 36psi :eek:
 

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Just to make a point here that the "recommended" is not an absolute. check this out from Bridge stone:

TRACK USE ONLY TIRE PRESSURE RECOMMENDATIONS

• Tire pressures should be carefully established, especially when running your motorcycle on the track.
• Always refer to the motorcycle manufacturer’s recommendations for track usage and tire pressures.
• Motorcycle tires intended for track usage (“race tires”) have temperatures and pressures at which they function best, which vary according to the circumstances. For specific Bridgestone tires when used on the track, you may use the information in this chart as a reference.
• Make adjustments to front and/or rear pressures based on the following: - Motorcycle type and setup - Track conditions, including surface condition and ambient temperature - Your riding experience
• Ride more carefully until your tires warm up to operating temperature.
• Tires intended for ordinary street/highway usage (“street tires”) do not perform the same as race tires, and have different operating temperatures. Using street tires on the track may void the tire manufacturer warranty.

S22 Front: 30 PSI
S22 Rear: 26 PSI

The fact that Bridgestone has recommended tire pressures for their own tire makes me lean on the side of people arguing that Honda's sticker on the swing arm/manual just a safe recommendation, NOT idea.
Again, the title of this thread is: Tire Pressure For The Street
 

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Well I'm just a noob that's been riding for decades all year around in anything from triple digit temps to just below freezing. Weird that I can get my knee down on the streets using manufacturer's recommended pressures when others say no way. "You can't enter a 40 mph turn at 80mph in the winter." Really? Come follow me.
And yet with all those years of experience you still trust a sticker on a swingarm more than your own judgement and personal experience...
 

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And yet with all those years of experience you still trust a sticker on a swingarm more than your own judgement and personal experience...
Does anyone on this site have a birthday before the Honda Motor Company was created? My years of experience confirms the info on the swingarm sticker.
 

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Attached is the page for Tire pressure straight out of the SC77 Honda Owner's Manual.
No word such as "Max" or "load" or "weight".
So, let's not put words in Honda's mouth.
 

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Haha, you're just messing with us now right?
I would really like to explore this statement further but it's really for my amusement only and doesn't add to this tire pressure thread in the least bit.
I would ask you start a "Bevo knows best" or "Bevo ruins everything" thread so we can get your insight into everything sportbike, or hell, life related.
Of course I'm joking about the shift points. Hell, Honda has been recommending shift points at least since the Trail 70 because I remember reading them as a kid. Obviously those are instructional. I'm sure I've shifted into 6th at 30mph on all my CBRs because that's the speed limit on residential streets. As long as you don't lug the engine, it doesn't matter.
 

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Does anyone on this site have a birthday before the Honda Motor Company was created? My years of experience confirms the info on the swingarm sticker.
Definitely not me.
That's fine if the sticker happens to be exactly ideal for your riding style, weight, climate, etc. But that does not mean the same is true for everyone else. I know it's not for me.
 
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Attached is the page for Tire pressure straight out of the SC77 Honda Owner's Manual.
No word such as "Max" or "load" or "weight".
So, let's not put words in Honda's mouth.
Which is based on the max load capacity also listed in the same manual.
No one with any sort of intelligence can believe one specific set of tire pressure settings can be best/optimal/correct for every model year CBR, every rider, every scenerio, every road, every temperature ever.
If the recommended tire pressure settings from Honda were not a "one setting for every situation safety recommendation" as most of us suggest than why wouldn't they list different pressures for different rider weights, passengers, street vs track, ambient temperatures, etc?
You can't truly believe this is a set in stone setting best for everyone, period! I have to believe you have more smarts than this and are just looking to argue and prove yourself right
 

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Same thing with Dunlop Q4 (which is meant more for track)
Yup, 36 front, 42 rear is pretty standard for Sport and Sport/Touring street tires. I'm sure it's a conspiracy among motorcycle and motorcycle tire manufacturers to sell more tires. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Which is based on the max load capacity also listed in the same manual.
No one with any sort of intelligence can believe one specific set of tire pressure settings can be best/optimal/correct for every model year CBR, every rider, every scenerio, every road, every temperature ever.
If the recommended tire pressure settings from Honda were not a "one setting for every situation safety recommendation" as most of us suggest than why wouldn't they list different pressures for different rider weights, passengers, street vs track, ambient temperatures, etc?
You can't truly believe this is a set in stone setting best for everyone, period! I have to believe you have more smarts than this and are just looking to argue and prove yourself right
See, that's why tire pressure is set "cold". It's based on ambient temperature so the air density inside the tire is not constant, however the pressure always is if set per manufacturer's recommendations.
 
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