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Can't Spell
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My 2015 still isn't turning exactly how I'd like, which is more like my F4i. Before you say "but the f4i is a 600!" remember they weigh 1lb different fully fueled because the F4i is literally an indestructible tank. Anywho, I went ahead of put a 190/55 on the rear to raise it slightly and really liked the improvement. Can't raise the rear anyway else that I know of without a new shock, so that leaves lowering the front. My F4i has a healthy front end lowering, any issues with it on the 1k? Or is there another way to raise the rear that I'm not aware of?
 

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See a professional to Setup suspension properly for your weight for road or track, wherever you are trying to ride.


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Can't Spell
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Discussion Starter #3
See a professional to Setup suspension properly for your weight for road or track, wherever you are trying to ride.
How does that help? I don't need to pay a professional to do what I can easily do myself, just looking for tips before I try this avenue myself. I am extremly pleased with how my F4i handles and my track bike is getting there and nobody has touched them either.
 

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Hi-

I have a 14 and have been gradually raising the rear bit by bit working with a tuner along the way. Have used a combination of tire size and ride height adjustment to do it but of course the latter requires an aftermarket shock. Went from 190/50 to 190/55 to 200/60 with longer shock. I have not noticed a big change in turn in (it's good enough for me) but it holds a line under power and finishes the corner much better.

I have not experimented with lowering the front (raising the tubes in the clamps). From what I've been told this bike doesn't respond well to lowering the front but raising the rear is beneficial. I can't recall what the reason was, just took the tuners word for it and since it was getting better by raising the rear I was happy. Hope that is helpful.

My street riding career started out on an F4i long ago. My riding was so hack I wouldn't have noticed if the tires were square or round let alone turn in performance..but hey man, it's a 600:smile:
 

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I had a F sport (basically F4i) as a track bike, and it was an amazing piece of kit once everything is set up right and I know what you mean.

The biggest improvement on the blade I made is when going from the stock Dunlops to S21 which was what I was running on the track bike(because I am cheap, not that quick and want eternal lasting rubber with decent feel)

Also with Big Pistion Forks the oil makes so much more difference in comparison to conventional forks on the F sport, I found that you need to change them more often to keep compression consistency so might worth looking at it if tyre is not an issue.

That's assuming you have already sussed out the sag and suspension setup, also the later turning in point of the blade.

Hope you sort this soon and not waste too much of the summer chasing setting.
 

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Can't Spell
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Discussion Starter #6
I had a F sport (basically F4i) as a track bike, and it was an amazing piece of kit once everything is set up right and I know what you mean.

The biggest improvement on the blade I made is when going from the stock Dunlops to S21 which was what I was running on the track bike(because I am cheap, not that quick and want eternal lasting rubber with decent feel)

Also with Big Pistion Forks the oil makes so much more difference in comparison to conventional forks on the F sport, I found that you need to change them more often to keep compression consistency so might worth looking at it if tyre is not an issue.

That's assuming you have already sussed out the sag and suspension setup, also the later turning in point of the blade.

Hope you sort this soon and not waste too much of the summer chasing setting.
The F sport over in Europe is literally the American F4i. Better cam, different flywheel, adjustable suspension, no center stand. In 04 Honda wanted to increase RR sales and gave our F sport the non sport banana seat, but kept all the hard parts the same. Weird I know.

Currently the bike has fresh Dunlop Q3+'s with 190/55 rear, and brand new maxima racing 7wt oil [extremely close to SS47]. Fork springs are supposed to be good for my weight stock. I've set sag, compression and rebound to where it behaves great except the turn in. Well the rear needs some more time starting with compression damping, but its getting there lol
 

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So where the issue? Is it won’t turn in as quick when trail brake or just when leaning in not under braking?

Generally I work from stock setting and decrease compression 1/4 turn with increase rebound 1/4 turn from stock setting at a time until I find a good starting point on feel then follow the suspension troubleshoot chart for minor line holding issue. The blade is stiffer on the front than the f4i so you can load it a lot more before having issues.

Also instead of raising the rear you can first try mounting the fork tube a bit lower, say by 5mm lower which can make the bike turn in quicker but it will unsteady the bike bit more on trail brake. That’s before you spend money on raising linkage.
 

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How does that help? I don't need to pay a professional to do what I can easily do myself, just looking for tips before I try this avenue myself. I am extremly pleased with how my F4i handles and my track bike is getting there and nobody has touched them either.
It helps by going to someone who does it for a living. Save a lot of time and money. Ask LDH how he "fixes" guys bike that think they know what they are doing. Someone that has a lot more experience can greatly improve your machine and save you a lot of time. Suspension tuning is one of the areas that are set wrong more than anything.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
So where the issue? Is it won’t turn in as quick when trail brake or just when leaning in not under braking?
Also instead of raising the rear you can first try mounting the fork tube a bit lower, say by 5mm lower which can make the bike turn in quicker but it will unsteady the bike bit more on trail brake. That’s before you spend money on raising linkage.
Its overall not as quick. The F4i was the same in the beginning. Had to both raise the rear and lower the front, and the front was very low with the Michelin power series [ran sport, power, power 2ct and power pures]. Had to raise it back up slightly but still much lower then stock with the Dunlop Q3's. Something about that stiffer carcass didn't like all the weight on it like the Michelins did.


It helps by going to someone who does it for a living. Save a lot of time and money. Ask LDH how he "fixes" guys bike that think they know what they are doing. Someone that has a lot more experience can greatly improve your machine and save you a lot of time. Suspension tuning is one of the areas that are set wrong more than anything.
I get what your saying, but it doesn't answer my question. You cant learn by paying people to do it for you. How did LDH get so good? He had to start somewhere, which is the bottem like everyone else.
 

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I get what your saying, but it doesn't answer my question. You cant learn by paying people to do it for you. How did LDH get so good? He had to start somewhere, which is the bottem like everyone else.



I had over a decades worth of tutelage from some of the best suspension tuners in the business and virtually unlimited track time for testing.
 

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Can't Spell
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Discussion Starter #11
I had over a decades worth of tutelage from some of the best suspension tuners in the business and virtually unlimited track time for testing.
Exactly. Now I'd like some tips and whatnot as I learn and I have unlimited going to work and back every day for testing :D
I setup my F4i, and love it. I setup my 600RR trackbike, and like what it does. I don't see setting up for a street ridden bike as that hard of a task. Im not racing.
 

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Its overall not as quick. The F4i was the same in the beginning. Had to both raise the rear and lower the front, and the front was very low with the Michelin power series [ran sport, power, power 2ct and power pures]. Had to raise it back up slightly but still much lower then stock with the Dunlop Q3's. Something about that stiffer carcass didn't like all the weight on it like the Michelins did.
Think you found your issue there. Also I do remember out of all the front tyre I picked up in the tyre shop few years ago S21 was the lightest and softest in the road legal/useable range, surely tyres have moved on now and there are others thats grippier and lighter.
 

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Tire shape has a lot to do with this. My 08 for track is Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa 200 /60 rear and 120/70 front, with forks raised almost 10mm in the front. I am no expert in tuning, and I only run mid pack pace in intermediate but I really like the feel. No issues on straights high speed, and it goes exactly where I want it to go, when I want it to. As they say YMMV
 

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Sometimes street setup is harder to do because you have more variation in road surface and you don’t have the repeatability. Ergonomics also makes a huge difference regarding turning capabilities as many people unconsciously fight the bike, not saying it’s you but that it’s an observation.

I too came from an F4i that I knew like the back of my hand. It’s ergonomics we’re horrible for me but I adapted and didn’t know until I began to meld with my Fireblade.

Adjusting front vs rear each gives a geometric change but they each come with side effects and it’s the side effect that you want to reduce. The question is: What part of the corner does the bike lose responsiveness? Entry, middle or ending? Does it run wide or cut in? How’s your throttle control? Lots of variables here and no quick answers without more information, hence the advice to work with a professional tuner.
 
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